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Williams sets tour

Wednesday, January 13, 2016 – Lucinda Williams has announced tour dates following the February release of "The Ghosts of Highway 20" (Highway 20/Thirty Tigers). The tour will kick off in Los Angeles on March 4 and will include a special five night run in New York City from March 13-18.

"The Ghosts of Highway 20," coming Feb. 5, revolves around the 1,500-mile Highway 20 (Interstate 20) that runs in part from Georgia to Texas. Whether it is cities she has resided in (Atlanta, Macon, GA), has family ties to (Shreveport, LA, Monroe, LA) or previously written about (Jackson, LA, Vicksburg, MS), Williams' experiences and connections to these areas are the basis for one of her most uniquely personal albums yet.

Guitarists Bill Frisell and Greg Leisz play on the 14-song collection. She puts her signature on a new interpretation of Bruce Springsteen's "Factory" and creates her own musical landscape with lost Woody Guthrie lyrics on "House of Earth."

The disc was co-produced by Williams, Leisz and Tom Overby and recorded with Williams' band Buick 6.

Tour dates are:
March 4 - Los Angeles, CA - Royce Hall at UCLA
March 9-10 - Philadelphia, PA - World Café Live
March 12 - New Haven, CT - College Street Music Hall
March 13, 14, 16, 17 & 18 - New York, NY - City Winery
March 19 - Tarrytown, NY - Tarrytown Music Hall
March 21-22 - Boston, MA - Paradise Rock Club
March 24-25 - Toronto, ON - Opera House
March 26 - Kent, OH - Kent Stage
March 28-29 - Ann Arbor, MI - The Ark 

March 30 - Nelsonville, OH - Stuart's Opera House
April 1-3 - Chicago, IL - Old Town School Of Folk Music
April 5, 6, 8, 9 - Minneapolis, MN - Dakota Jazz Club & Restaurant
April 12-13 - Denver, CO - Bluebird Theater
April 14 - Breckenridge, CO - Riverwalk Center
April 17-18 - Dallas, TX - The Kessler Theater
April 22-23 - New Braunfels, TX - Gruene Hall

More news for Lucinda Williams

CD reviews for Lucinda Williams

The Ghosts of Highway 20 CD review - The Ghosts of Highway 20
As impressive as her last album "Down Where The Spirit Meets The Bone" was, this much is true about Lucinda Williams: the next album will be as stellar or even more. That's not to say any of her releases are subpar, but the quality (and now consistency) of her output makes her a precious gem. And this record, an album inspired and influenced by I-20, a winding piece of pavement that cuts throughout her home state of Louisiana, is the usual extraordinary affair you'd expect. »»»
Down Where The Spirit Meets The Bone CD review - Down Where The Spirit Meets The Bone
There's little left to be said when it comes the link between quality songs and Lucinda Williams. From her early days to her commercial breakthrough with 1998's "Car Wheels On A Gravel Road," Williams has always created her own heartfelt nuggets that can be equally haunting and rocking. And this newest release is perhaps her most ambitious effort to date, a 2-disc, 20-track album, starting with the barren "Compassion" that recalls some precious combination of Linda »»»
Lucinda Williams (25th Anniversary release) CD review - Lucinda Williams (25th Anniversary release)
Relistening to Lucinda Williams' 1988 self-titled release, it's initially startling to hear how pure her voice sounds. Williams' vocal cords have taken on so much character over the years, so it's a little like listening to Joni Mitchell then and now. This remastered reissue also includes a Netherlands concert, as well as some bonus cuts. It adds up to around two hours of Williams' music and is certainly worth the time spent listening to it. Even though her voice was a »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Lane, Ramsey, Barrett cover their bases – Covers played a far more prominent role than usual at a country show. And instead of what is typically the least course of resistance in recent years of country artists succumbing to their renditions of a rock hit, Chris Lane, Mason Ramsey and Gabby Barrett played songs that actually were country hits. Interestingly, the youngest of the bunch, Ramsey,... »»»
Concert Review: Mumford and Sons up to snuff, for the most part – Mumford and Sons have always played it smart when it has come to career moves. They have not overtoured by becoming regular fixtures on the touring circuit. Their M.O. is to tour just enough upon an album release and then disappear for a stretch. Ditto for releasing new music ("Delta" just came out last month, Mumford's first release... »»»
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