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Morgan returns in February

Monday, December 21, 2015 – Lorrie Morgan, who had hits with "What Part Of No," "Except For Monday," "Five Minutes," and "Watch Me," will be back next year with her first solo album in five years.

Morgan will release "Letting Go... Slow" on Feb. 12, 2016 on Shanachie Entertainment. The album follows her collaboration album, "Dos Divas," released with Pam Tillis in 2013.

The new release features 12 tracks. Produced by Richard Landis, (whose credits include some of Morgan's top hits, Vince Gill, The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band), includes soulful ballads like "What I'd Say," "Slow," and covers Bobbie Gentry's "Ode to Billy Joe," Larry Gatlin and The Gatlin Brothers' "I've Done Enough Dying Today" and Bob Dylan's classic, "Lay Lady Lay."

The daughter of late country star George Morgan, Morgan made her Opry debut at the age of 13 and was one of the youngest to ever be inducted as a lifetime member, at age 24. She also has had hits with "I Didn't Know My Own Strength," "I Guess You Had To Be There" and "Something In Red."

Songs on the new disc are:
1.Strange (Fred Burch, Mel Tillis)
2. Ode To Billy Joe (Bobbie Gentry)
3. It Is Raining At Your House (Vern Gosdin, Hank Cochran, Dean Dillon)
4. Something About Trains (Christopher Crockett)
5. I've Done Enough Dying Today (Larry Gatlin)
6. Lay Lady Lay (Bob Dylan)
7. Slow (Ashlee Hewitt, Dean Sams, Onja Rose)
8. Spilt Milk (Kristina Train, James Hogarth, Francis White)
9. Jesus and Hairspray (Katie Kessler, Donald Poythress)
10. Lonely Whiskey (Paul Sikes, Jennifer Zuffinetti)
11. What I'd Say (Robert Bellarmine Byrne, William Soule Robinson)
12. How Does It Feel (Mark Oliverius, Loretta Lynn Morgan, Kelly Lang)

Upcoming tour dates are:
Jan. 8 Seminole Casino & Hotel - Immokalee, Fla.
Jan. 9 Orange Blossom Opry - Weirsdale, Fla.
Jan. 16 Chiefs Event Center at Shoshone-Bannock - Fort Hall, Idaho
Jan. 17 Northern Quest Resort & Casino - Airway Heights, Wash.
Jan. 29 Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts - Kansas City, Mo.
Feb. 13 Downstream Casino Resort - Quapaw, Okla.
Feb. 20 Little River Casino Resort - Manistee, Mich.
Feb. 26 Horseshoe Casino - Bossier City, La.

More news for Lorrie Morgan

CD reviews for Lorrie Morgan

Letting Go...Slow CD review - Letting Go...Slow
During her lengthy career Loretta Lynn Morgan has had a lot of hits, though lately she has been in the news more for cutting cake (married six times at press time) than for cutting records. "Letting Go . . . Slow" is her first solo album since 2010's pop-oriented "I Walk Alone" (about which the less said the better), and she seems to be trying to make a country comeback, going mostly with covers on this record. Speaking of covers, for some reason Morgan has gone with a »»»
Show Me How
Lorrie Morgan's career may have enjoyed a higher profile, but that shouldn't be because of albums like this. The sexy blonde generally hits the mark. What sets Morgan apart and always has is her singing ability. She got strong pipes time and again and uses them to good effect throughout. That's particularly true on the uptempo numbers such as the lead off "Do You Still Wanna Buy Me That Drink (Frank)" where she plays a strong twice-divorced woman with two teens to raise and meets a man in a bar. »»»
The Color of Roses
Lorrie Morgan always has benefitted from a strong voice that could be alternately vulnerable or upbeat with the requisite emotion plus a slew of good songs to help her voice put them over. But on this 19-song live set, featuring mainly a bunch of her hits and some generally well chosen hits, both Morgan and band sound remarkably inert. This is quite a surprise because in concert, Morgan possesses a lot of vocal energy and dynamism. In fact, there isn't a whole lot of difference between what is »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Daniels wears out bows, but music endures – After each of the first few songs Charlie Daniels played, his 'fiddle tech (?)' exchanged his bow. Is this because he was playing particularly hard? Perhaps. Whatever the case, Daniels and his five-piece band clearly appeared to be giving it their all during the act's hour-and-a-half set. As it is the Christmas month, Daniels sang a... »»»
Concert Review: Rawlings easily moves out of the shadow – Every once in awhile David Rawlings moves out of the shadow of musical mate Gillian Welch to launch his own tour. While Welch, for whom Rawlings plays guitar, has the more prominent career, nights like this ably confirm that there is a reason does his own thing as well. Rawlings, who released the very fine "Poor David's Almanack" in... »»»
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