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Illness forces Twain to cancel tour dates

Tuesday, October 6, 2015 – Shania Twain is canceling two shows due to illness, she said on her web site.

The Rock This Country tour dates at the Verizon Wireless Arena on Oct. 6 in Manchester, N.H. and the Times Union Center on Oct. 7 in Albany, N.Y. were cancelled due to illness. "Shania Twain's doctors have advised her to rest for several days after she was diagnosed with a respiratory infection," her web site said.

The concert dates are unable to be rescheduled due to Twain's current touring schedule. All tickets will be refunded at point of purchase.

"Shania Twain apologizes for any inconvenience this may cause her fans and greatly appreciates their understanding," the web site said.

The tour will resume on Oct. 9 at the Videotron Centre in Quebec City, Canada.

More news for Shania Twain

CD reviews for Shania Twain

UP!
When listening to Shania Twain's first album in five years, the listener is faced with making the big decision - blue or green disc. Green supposedly contains 19 country songs. With red, you get the pop version of those same exact songs recorded (international fans get a blue album with Asian sounds). Twain may be generous with the amount of material here, but the overall effect is one of too much music and not enough quality. Yes, there are some country touches and instrumentation, but if you »»»
Come On Over
Like a good many country artists in the HNC phase of country, success seems to breed a situation where artists turn their backs on the very genre which spawned them. After the massive success of "The Woman In Me," Shania Twain has strayed very far from country in what is essentially a pop album. Few of the 16 songs are country: the first single, the catchy, uptempo "Love Gets Me Every Time" with its killer three fiddle attack, "You're Still The One," "Honey, I'm Home," (a lousy job blues song, »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: With Tuttle, the music's in good hands – Molly Tuttle, preternaturally talented artist and current reigning IBMA Guitar Player of The Year (2017) lives up to the hype. Her songs are well-crafted and soulfully delivered. Boothbay Harbor Maine is a typical seaside resort town (perhaps slightly more upscale than most), which is somnolent, if not downright dead, 8 1/2 months of the year.... »»»
Concert Review: Carlile brings thoughtfulness – Brandi Carlile returned to the GRAMMY Museum for the third time, and it's easy to see why she's always invited back. The evening began with GRAMMY Executive Scott Goldman interviewing Carlile on a pair of stuffed chairs, which was followed directly by a brief set of live songs. The interview portion was informative, while Carlile's... »»»
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