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Gilbert leads bill at Chattanooga tribute concert

Thursday, September 17, 2015 – Brantley Gilbert paid homage to five murdered military members yesterday during Chattanooga Unite: A Tribute on the River" before 80,000 people.

Trace Adkins, Colt Ford, Aaron Lewis, Jamey Johnson and Harry Connick Jr. also participated in the concert to remember the five, who were killed in July by Muhammad Youssef Abdulazeez, who shot people at two military installations in Chattanooga, Tenn.

The concert included the families of U.S. Marine Gunnery Sgt. Thomas Sullivan, U.S Marine Staff Sgt. David Wyatt, U.S. Marine Sgt. Carson Holmquist, U.S. Marine Lance Corporal Skip Wells and U.S. Navy Petty Officer Randall Smith.

Gilbert closed the day-long event with number one hits like "Country Must Be Country Wide," "Bottoms Up" and "One Hell of an Amen."

Last month, Gilbert announced the special concert on-air with local radio station WUSY.

"We all know why we're here. We're here to mourn and we're here to grieve but we're also here to celebrate the lives and the legacies of those we lost," Gilbert began from the two-story tall Riverbend stage. "We can't bring your husbands, brothers or sons back, but hopefully we can make you smile tonight," directing his thank you to the families of the fallen soldiers.

The tribute kicked off with an Armed Forces parade, memorial ceremony and remembrance followed by a Blue Angels flyover. Chattanooga native and actor Samuel L. Jackson emceed the event.

Donations from the free event will be added to the initial $230,000 presented to The National Compassion Fund yesterday. The families of the five fallen soldiers will benefit from the Chattanooga Unite funds raised. Donations are still being taken via

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For those fans worrying over the potential demise of bro country, rest easy; Brantley Gilbert is here to keep that flag flying high. Comprised of a solid set of radio ready rockers alongside a few tamer numbers, Gilbert sets out to prove the establishment wrong, rolling his way through 16 tales of hard living and partying. Yet, while Gilbert holds strong to the "bro country" stance, he's also very much his own man, allowing his faith and values to pull front and center as well. »»»
Just As I Am: Platinum Edition CD review - Just As I Am: Platinum Edition
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Just As I Am CD review - Just As I Am
Brantley Gilbert's third release is a collection of songs that define who he is as an artist. There is a notable absence of wild experimentation here; these are straightforward songs from the artist who broke through with "Halfway to Heaven." The tattooed country rocker follows in the footsteps of Eric Church's recent hit, "The Outsiders," making a conscious step away from the overproduced hip hop country that artists like Florida Georgia Line are taking to the top of the charts. »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Cantrell continues to satisfy – Laura Cantrell may never be a country star. Not at this stage of her career when she's 50, touring here and there and releasing new music every few years or so. But five albums in, Cantrell continues as a warm, enjoyable and worthy purveyor of her brand of country. That would mean going towards a more traditional side, not rushing the songs... »»»
Concert Review: Not only is Turner traditional, he's popular – Every time Josh Turner reached for some of those wonderful subterranean low notes, which he often pulled out during his enjoyable night show, it was like a superhero applying a superpower. He didn't need this extra advantage to please his audience; he has so many quality songs stockpiled in his catalogue already doing the job.... »»»
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