Sign up for newsletter
 

Dolly Parton releases new single

Tuesday, August 28, 2007 – Dolly Parton debuts her new single "Better Get To Livin'" today exclusively for download on the iTunes Store and on country radio.

"Better Get To Livin'" will officially be sent to country radio Sept. 28. The track, written and produced by Parton with Kent Wells, is the first single from her forthcoming new CD "Backwoods Barbie," due in stores in the first quarter next year. This is the first release on her recently formed Dolly Records, an independent label which will focus on releases from her catalog.

"My tunes on iTunes, come give me a play," said Parton. "Digital Dolly...yep, that's me."

"Kent is the one who said that I should write a song about my attitude as so many people are always asking what my secret to success and happiness is," says Dolly.

Parton sings, "You better get to livin', givin'/A little more thought about bein' a little more willin'/To make a better way/Don't sweat the small stuff, keep your chin up/Just hang tough and if it gets too rough/Fall on your knees and pray/And do that every day"

"I think life has always been a pressure cooker, and people react to whatever pressures they're under at the time according to their tolerance level and their mental attitude," she said. "Certainly with so much attention today on being skinny and beautiful, rich and famous, equal pay for equal work, getting ahead, raising kids, holding down a job, getting older, etc. I think this song says some things to let people know they're not the only ones in that fix. And this song offers some advice for a way out."

For "Backwoods Barbie," Parton's first mainstream country album in over 17 years, Parton wrote nine of the songs and produced the CD with band leader and guitarist Kent Wells. "The song 'Backwoods Barbie' pretty much says it all," she said. "I grew up poor and ragged, always dreamed of being beautiful like Barbie and the models in the Fredericks catalog. It's true that the way I look is just a country girl's idea of glamour, but it comes from an honest place. Backwoods Barbie just seemed like such a perfect title for a country album for me."

It's also one of the songs from the forthcoming Broadway musical "9 to 5 The Musical" expected to hit New York in the Spring of 2009, which Parton also wrote all the words and music for.

As for creating her own indie label to focus exclusively on her music, Parton said, "I put it on my own label because many of the majors really didn't want me because of my age, thinking I was over. But I feel different about that. I figured the major labels are pretty much a thing of the past anyway, kind of like they thought I was. The way music is being played today, why not make all the money, if there's any money to be made. I'd rather have all of something than some of nothing. So I hired Danny Nozell to help manage me and all the things concerning me with all the new ideas. And with his knowledge of the new age and the team that he's put together, I just didn't see how I could miss."

"I might, of course; but he has assembled a great team and has a great marketing plan. And I'm having a great old time in this new day and age, so why not give it a whirl? I'll never stop. I'll never end until they lay me down, and then I'll go kicking and screaming and trying to sing and write a song."

Parton also launched her first authorized music website in her 45-year career: www.DollyPartonMusic.net. The full site launches at the end of September and is currently accepting email sign ups for ongoing announcements.

Parton plans a world-wide tour and television appearances in the U.S., Europe, Australia and Canada.

More news for Dolly Parton

CD reviews for Dolly Parton

Better Day CD review - Better Day
If Dolly Parton were to host a summer replacement daytime TV show, her new record album could very well be the soundtrack. It is so totally Dolly - an hour's worth of can-do, I'm-country-gol'-dang-it-but-don't-forget-I'm-Hollywood, yet never abandoning the singer-songwriter that's been her overriding trademark. It gets a little silly, which you expect from Dolly. In fact, the song she co-wrote with Mac Davis, Country Is as Country Does - gets a lot silly. »»»
Dolly: Dolly Live From London CD review - Dolly: Dolly Live From London
Dolly Parton took her acoustic guitar, her dazzling array of stage costumes, her still-vibrant-at-60-something voice and her down-home charm to greet her fans across the pond in 2008. She also took a video camera and recording equipment. The CD (and accompanying DVD) was recorded during Parton's sold out performances at the 02 arena in London. As one of the most recognizable faces of country music around the world, it is beautiful to hear how well Parton's universally appealing songs of »»»
Dolly CD review - Dolly
Over the course of 99 tracks on 4 discs, RCA/Legacy Recordings has given music fans a concise and nearly complete snapshot of Dolly Parton's considerable impact on country music with the release of the new box set - a task not accomplished by any other collection. The set covers all the career-defining hits you would expect like Jolene, 9 To 5, Islands In The Stream, I Will Always Love You and Here You Come Again, but what makes this collection truly special is the unreleased material it »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Hurray for the Riff: more than just a great name – Hurray for the Riff Raff is one well-named group. Not that it signifies all that much musically, but at least it's catchy and makes you want to root for the underdog. With a lot to live up moniker wise, the band in concert - which, in reality, is lead singer Alynda Lee Segarra from New Orleans and her backing mates - more than lived up to the "pressure.... »»»
Concert Review: Carolina Chocolate Drops easily weather changes – The personnel in the Carolina Chocolate Drops may have changed drastically over the last few years - two of its three founding members are no longer - but that apparently has not had any impact whatsoever on the group both when it comes to the musical direction and the ability to come through in concert. Rhiannon Giddens, who plays fiddle... »»»
Subscribe to Country News Digest Country News Digest      Follow Country Standard Time on twitter CST      Visit Country Standard Time on Facebook CST

Elsewhere in the news

Currently at the CST blogs

Gerry House comes out (from behind the mic) For 25 years, Gerry House spent every weekday morning in people's living rooms. As the host of the much-loved and much-acclaimed morning show, Gerry House and the House Foundation, House reigned on the airwaves on Nashville's WSIX-FM from 1983-2010, taking a brief hiatus to work for WSM-AM in Nashville and for KLAC in Los Angeles.... »»»
Once a Carter Girl, always a Carter Girl Expectations of being a "Carter Girl" - the way Carlene Carter refers to herself with her latest album title - must be extremely daunting at times. "It's as difficult as you want to make it," Carter explains. "I've always just embraced the fact that I was born into this family and very proud to be part of it." However, much like her mother, June Carter Cash, Carlene has always been a free spirit and fiercely individualistic. ... »»»
Loveless goes "Somewhere Else" To take a page from Judy Collins' notebook, Lydia Loveless has seen life from both sides now. After a childhood in tiny Coshocton, Ohio, a move to Columbus and a gig playing bass in her family's new wave/rock band as a teenager, Loveless set out on her own musical path at the age of 17. In 2010, the 20-year-old Loveless released her debut album, "The Only Man," which was critically acclaimed but just barely heard by the general public.... »»»
Carpenter strings her crowd along Mary Chapin Carpenter's songs have always transcended the mundane, whether through the introspective songs about life and death on albums like "The Age of Miracles" or "The Calling" or in the humorous ways she laughs at fate in songs such as I Feel Lucky or The Bug in order to show the chinks in our mortal facades. Her music has often helped us get beyond ourselves to see the places where real meaning lies, whether we decide to embrace such meaning or not.... »»»
Turn It Up CD review - Turn It Up
Josh Thompson's sophomore release, "Turn It Up" is his first on Toby Keith's Show Dog label. It seems to be a good match because both artists are cut from the same cloth. Thompson is also known as a champion of the everyman. Turns out they both have the same tendency to go over the top. Thompson excessively showcases the blue collar lifestyle the way Keith champions patriotism. »»»
High Noon CD review - High Noon
Jerrod Niemann's new "High Noon" album is better than the annoying single, "Drink to That All Night," might lead you to believe. Fortunately, the album is not completely a Luke Bryan sound-alike. Even so, there are moments where Niemann sometimes sounds a little too much like his musical contemporaries. »»»
Out Among the Stars CD review - Out Among the Stars
One would think that with all the archival music, reissues and postmortem tributes released on Johnny Cash's behalf, the vaults would have been scraped pretty clean by now, with only scraps left for dedicated completists to feast upon. So it comes as no small surprise to find that the Cash archivists actually uncovered some entire sessions that haven't been unearthed until now. »»»
Summer Number Seventeen CD review - Summer Number Seventeen
Quick, what guy compiled 40 number one country singles, recorded with everybody from Ray Charles to Elvis, but has yet to be enshrined in the Country Music Hall of Fame? Yes, it's Ronnie Milsap, now in his 70s, just like Merle Haggard (who was inducted 20 years ago). Clearly, the ornery outlaws get more attention than the nice guy romantics. And it doesn't help that Milsap has always been interested in many different flavors of music »»»
Slow Me Down CD review - Slow Me Down
Once upon a time, circa 1997, Sara Evans was a dyed in the wool traditional country singer. "Three Chords and the Truth" was the most appropriate title of her debut. But times and styles have changed in the country music world. Seventeen years later, not only is Evans not traditional sounding, she also doesn't particularly heed her own advice from the title. And that means she pretty much maintains a fast, big sounding, pop approach to the 11 songs... »»»
Reflections CD review - Reflections
Listening to Don Williams is like putting on that old flannel shirt you've had since your college days; it's a comfortable fit, soft and reassuring without looking too much like something your dad might own. Williams' style of country music isn't much in fashion these days, but it carries a bit of a timeless quality with it - like George Strait, this new album could have come out any time in Williams' career. »»»