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Dolly Parton releases new single

Tuesday, August 28, 2007 – Dolly Parton debuts her new single "Better Get To Livin'" today exclusively for download on the iTunes Store and on country radio.

"Better Get To Livin'" will officially be sent to country radio Sept. 28. The track, written and produced by Parton with Kent Wells, is the first single from her forthcoming new CD "Backwoods Barbie," due in stores in the first quarter next year. This is the first release on her recently formed Dolly Records, an independent label which will focus on releases from her catalog.

"My tunes on iTunes, come give me a play," said Parton. "Digital Dolly...yep, that's me."

"Kent is the one who said that I should write a song about my attitude as so many people are always asking what my secret to success and happiness is," says Dolly.

Parton sings, "You better get to livin', givin'/A little more thought about bein' a little more willin'/To make a better way/Don't sweat the small stuff, keep your chin up/Just hang tough and if it gets too rough/Fall on your knees and pray/And do that every day"

"I think life has always been a pressure cooker, and people react to whatever pressures they're under at the time according to their tolerance level and their mental attitude," she said. "Certainly with so much attention today on being skinny and beautiful, rich and famous, equal pay for equal work, getting ahead, raising kids, holding down a job, getting older, etc. I think this song says some things to let people know they're not the only ones in that fix. And this song offers some advice for a way out."

For "Backwoods Barbie," Parton's first mainstream country album in over 17 years, Parton wrote nine of the songs and produced the CD with band leader and guitarist Kent Wells. "The song 'Backwoods Barbie' pretty much says it all," she said. "I grew up poor and ragged, always dreamed of being beautiful like Barbie and the models in the Fredericks catalog. It's true that the way I look is just a country girl's idea of glamour, but it comes from an honest place. Backwoods Barbie just seemed like such a perfect title for a country album for me."

It's also one of the songs from the forthcoming Broadway musical "9 to 5 The Musical" expected to hit New York in the Spring of 2009, which Parton also wrote all the words and music for.

As for creating her own indie label to focus exclusively on her music, Parton said, "I put it on my own label because many of the majors really didn't want me because of my age, thinking I was over. But I feel different about that. I figured the major labels are pretty much a thing of the past anyway, kind of like they thought I was. The way music is being played today, why not make all the money, if there's any money to be made. I'd rather have all of something than some of nothing. So I hired Danny Nozell to help manage me and all the things concerning me with all the new ideas. And with his knowledge of the new age and the team that he's put together, I just didn't see how I could miss."

"I might, of course; but he has assembled a great team and has a great marketing plan. And I'm having a great old time in this new day and age, so why not give it a whirl? I'll never stop. I'll never end until they lay me down, and then I'll go kicking and screaming and trying to sing and write a song."

Parton also launched her first authorized music website in her 45-year career: www.DollyPartonMusic.net. The full site launches at the end of September and is currently accepting email sign ups for ongoing announcements.

Parton plans a world-wide tour and television appearances in the U.S., Europe, Australia and Canada.

More news for Dolly Parton

CD reviews for Dolly Parton

Pure & Simple CD review - Pure & Simple
Dolly Parton is no stranger to flash. Even before our modern country era, where many of the most successful artists rival contemporary pop stars for high profile image manipulation, Parton had the city girl look down pat (alas, without ever denying her Appalachian roots). However, this master songwriter has simply given us an album about as close to purity as one can get. The incredibly bright Parton is far from simple, however, so the "simple" in this album's title solely refers »»»
Blue Smoke CD review - Blue Smoke
Of all the songs you never expected Dolly Parton to cover, Bon Jovi's "Lay Your Hands on Me" has got to be near the top of the list. Although by the time Miley Cyrus's godmother gets through personalizing the song there's not enough of the original left to call it a cover - just a word or two here and there and the chorus, which for those of you who have forgotten this masterpiece of 80's hair metal is just the title of the song repeated almost enough times to make a »»»
Better Day CD review - Better Day
If Dolly Parton were to host a summer replacement daytime TV show, her new record album could very well be the soundtrack. It is so totally Dolly - an hour's worth of can-do, I'm-country-gol'-dang-it-but-don't-forget-I'm-Hollywood, yet never abandoning the singer-songwriter that's been her overriding trademark. It gets a little silly, which you expect from Dolly. In fact, the song she co-wrote with Mac Davis, Country Is as Country Does - gets a lot silly. »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Earle maintains his value – Steve Earle is always worth seeing live. He's accumulated such a treasure trove of stellar songs over the years, in fact, that he could easily rely on past accomplishments - as so many others do. However, his latest album, "So You Wannabe an Outlaw," is easily one of his best. Therefore, his choice to perform a goodly chunk of this... »»»
Concert Review: Paisley brings the magic – If you've heard many of Brad Paisley's studio records, you know at least some of what to expect - for sure, there will be a mixture of the fun and funny with the tender and teary. Then throw in some blistering guitar work, and don't forget the celebration of grown-up beverages. A Brad Paisley concert is no different.... »»»
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