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Rhett gets "Tangled Up"

Monday, August 3, 2015 – Thomas Rhett will get "Tangled Up" in a new batch of music when his sophomore disc drops Sept. 25.

The album on Valory Music contains 13 songs that mix his various influences including country and soul. His father, Rhett Akins, had a hand in writing three of the songs. "I didn't grow up listening to just one style of music," Rhett said. "So, I don't know how to write just one style of music. Whether these songs have more of a pop influence or more of a hip hop influence or a completely country influence, they all - in some crazy way - cohesively sound like a me song."

The 13-track album is filled with party anthems, dance tunes, drinking songs and love ballads.

"At our shows, there aren't any rules," he said. "There's no such thing as standing still and just singing a song. I love jumping into the crowd. I love to dance. The whole show is very uptempo, high energy, and completely unpredictable."

Songs on the CD are:
1. "Anthem" (Nicolle Galyon, Shane McAnally, Jimmy Robbins)
2. "Crash And Burn" (Jesse Frasure, Chris Stapleton)
3. "South Side" (Thomas Rhett, Jesse Frasure, Chris Stapleton)
4. "Die A Happy Man" (Thomas Rhett, Sean Douglas, Joe Spargur)
5. "Vacation" (Written by Thomas Rhett, Thomas Allen, Harold Brown, Morris Dickerson, Sean Douglas, Gerry Goldstein, Leroy Jordan, Charles Miller, Lee Osker, Andreas Schuller, Howard Scott, Joe Spargur, Ricky Reed, John Ryan)
6. "Like It's the Last Time"
 (Thomas Rhett, Rhett Akins, Ben Hayslip)
7. "T-Shirt" (Ashley Gorley, Luke Laird, Shane McAnally)
8. "Single Girl" 
(Thomas Rhett, Rhett Akins, Ross Copperman, Ben Hayslip)
9. "The Day You Stop Looking Back" (Jaren Johnston, Luke Laird)
10. "Tangled Up" (Chris DeStefano, Adam Hoffman, Matt Lipkins, Josh Osborne, Scott Schwartz)
11. "Playing With Fire" feat. Jordin Sparks * (Thomas Rhett, Rhett Akins, Ashley Gorley)
12. "I Feel Good" feat. Lunch Money Lewis ** (Thomas Rhett, Sean Douglas, Teddy Geiger, Jacob Hindlin, Gamal Lewis, Charlie Puth, Joe Spargur)
13. "Learned it From the Radio"* (Nicolle Galyon, Ashley Gorley, Jimmy Robbins)
Produced by Dann Huff and Jesse Frasure
* Produced by Chris DeStefano

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CD reviews for Thomas Rhett

Life Changes CD review - Life Changes
Thomas Rhett references mangoritas, Coldplay and verified Instagram accounts on his third album, and for some, that may be a deal-breaker. His ultra-contemporary style and pop culture smarts may be anathema for fans of traditional country. However, writing Rhett off by stamping a cowboy boot and hollering "That ain't country!" writes off some truly standout songs - created by combining the best elements of country and pop music. Take the sophisticated songwriting of country and the »»»
Tangled Up CD review - Tangled Up
Thomas Rhett picks up where he left off on his 2013 debut, "It Goes Like This," which netted three chart toppers. Rhett would be hard to categorize as country, although in the big tent philosophy of what passes these days, country serves more as a marketing niche. He's more soul, funk and hip hop than country. His catchy, bouncy "Crash and Burn," another number one song, is squarely soulful pop with a few small sonic tweaks (whistles, backing "uhs" near the end) »»»
It Goes Like This CD review - It Goes Like This
Thomas Rhett has enjoyed a strong pedigree as a hit songwriter at the tender age of 23. After all, he has helped pen Jason Aldean's 1994,Parking Lot Party by Lee Brice and Round Here by Florida Georgia Line. Not to mention having a father, Rhett Atkins, who has enjoyed both a career as a recording artist and a hit songwriter himself (he also helped write five of the dozen songs). So, it should come as no surprise that Rhett shares a lot of the same clichés as those he has written hits for. »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Lots to like about McKenna (when you could hear her) – Lori McKenna had lots of reasons to be in a good mood. First off, the opening band, a pop act called teenender included two of her sons. In two days, her 11th disc, "The Tree" would be released to glowing reviews. So it would seem that this homecoming show was the ideal setting with all five kids, her husband, siblings, cousins, people who... »»»
Concert Review: With Sugarland, the wait was worth it – A few songs into Sugarland's show, Kristian Bush referenced the band's five-year gap between tours saying, "A lot of people think Jennifer and I have been on a five-year vacation. Actually, we've been very busy." Clearly a lot of that time was spent in rehearsal. The duo put on a two-hour high energy gem that started out big... »»»
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