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In the meantime, Pardi surfaces with new old music

Monday, May 11, 2015 – While Jon Pardi is working on his sophomore studio album, he is going digital with "The B Sides, 2011-2014" on May 18.

The release features six previously unreleased tracks recorded for consideration for Pardi's debut album, "Write You A Song." Pardi plays many of these songs in his live show, according to his web site. Pardi co-produced and co-wrote all of the songs on "The B Sides."

The track listing is:
1. Fightin' The Fool (Jon Pardi, Bart Butler, Davy Ulbrich)
2. Over My Head (Jon Pardi, Trent Summar, Gary Nicholson)
3. Drinkin' With Me (Jon Pardi, Britton Cameron, Doug Kahan)
4. Back on the Backroads (Jon Pardi, Davy Ulbrich, Rich McCready)
5. Rainy Night Song (Jon Pardi)
6. Borrowed Time (Jon Pardi, Keith Follese, Adrienne Follese)

Pardi recently partnered with VEVO for "Intro to the Pardi," an exclusive three-part documentary following his journey from rural northern California to Nashville. The series also chronicles his debut album release on Capitol Records, as well as touring.

More news for Jon Pardi

CD reviews for Jon Pardi

California Sunrise CD review - California Sunrise
Jon Pardi apparently isn't worried about chasing something new. He makes that clear on the opening "Out of Style" where he sings "The common way we work and play/Are still alive and well today/Don't' need to find a new way to say/We don't get out of style." He may not have penned the song, but Pardi continues mining a more traditional sound on his recordings (his live shows tend to rock far too much as if he's trying to figure just who he is musically). »»»
Write You a Song CD review - Write You a Song
Jon Pardi is an anomaly these days - you're not going to hear any rap or hip hop in the debut from this California native. Nor proclamations about how great farm life is. Yes, you'll hear rocking vocals and instrumentation at times, but the 11 songs are far more steeped in country than most anyone out there today. That means there's twang in the forceful vocals - a healthy dose of it - plus pedal steel and fiddle (both are prominent on the title track, which has a sort of Jerry Lee Lewis feel). »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Womack planned a good night – Lee Ann Womack pretty much summed up where she's at these days in concluding her show with Don Williams "Lord I Hope This Day Is Good." The ever-strong voiced country traditionalist sang, "I don't need fortune and I don't need fame" with the concluding line of the stanza asking the Man upstairs to "plan a good day for me.... »»»
Concert Review: Cantrell continues to satisfy – Laura Cantrell may never be a country star. Not at this stage of her career when she's 50, touring here and there and releasing new music every few years or so. But five albums in, Cantrell continues as a warm, enjoyable and worthy purveyor of her brand of country. That would mean going towards a more traditional side, not rushing the songs... »»»
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