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Radio host Bones announces bio

Monday, April 27, 2015 – Radio host Bobby Bones will pen his memoir, in a deal announced today by Dey Street Books/HarperCollins.

The Bobby Bones Show is heard on iHeartMedia country music stations, including Washington, D.C., Boston and Nashville. He is also heard nationally through the iHeartRadio digital service.

The Bobby Bones Show has been described as an unscripted, five-hour sprint across the state of country music, modern life, celebrity and social media. Bones also tours across America to sold-out crowds with his comedy duo, The Raging Idiot. In 2014, after just a year in country music, The Bobby Bones Show won its first Academy of Country Music Award.

Bones grew up poor, the son of a single, addicted young mother and an absent father. Bones, born Bobby Estell, is from Mountain Pine, Ark., a lumber mill town with a population under 800. At age five, David Letterman was his personal hero.

First in his family to graduate from college, he landed his first job in radio at age 17, soon took the on-air name "Bobby Bones." He worked in Little Rock, Ark. and Austin before working for iHeartMedia. "I've always been a pretty private guy," Bones reveals. "But I think I found my outlet, which is oddly one of the least private places I can be."

"I'm not a traditional country music guy," said Bones, "but the music reflects where and how I grew up, and yes, you could say my life has been like a country song, full of highs and lows and some crazy stuff along the way. I aim to tell it from the front seat of this roller coaster ride."

Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Womack planned a good night – Lee Ann Womack pretty much summed up where she's at these days in concluding her show with Don Williams "Lord I Hope This Day Is Good." The ever-strong voiced country traditionalist sang, "I don't need fortune and I don't need fame" with the concluding line of the stanza asking the Man upstairs to "plan a good day for me.... »»»
Concert Review: Cantrell continues to satisfy – Laura Cantrell may never be a country star. Not at this stage of her career when she's 50, touring here and there and releasing new music every few years or so. But five albums in, Cantrell continues as a warm, enjoyable and worthy purveyor of her brand of country. That would mean going towards a more traditional side, not rushing the songs... »»»
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