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Watson goes "Insane"

Wednesday, March 18, 2015 – Dale Watson will release his new studio album, "Call Me Insane," on June 9.

The album was recorded in Austin with producer Lloyd Maines (Robert Earl Keen, Jerry Jeff Walker) and via Red House/Ameripolitan Records on CD, digital, and vinyl.

Watson is in Austin this week for South X South West.. He will appear tonight on ABC's Jimmy Kimmel Live from SxSW when he'll join the house band Cleto and the Cletones broadcasting live from SxSW. Watson will also MC the first SxSW "Ameripolitan" showcase featuring rockabilly, Texas swing, outlaw country and honky tonk.

Album highlights include "Jonesin' For Jones," a love song to the music of the George Jones; "A Day At A Time," a song about "getting by by barely getting by"; "Call Me Insane," the moody title track; and "Mamas Don't Let Your Cowboys Grow Up To Be Babies," which is the only cover song on the album (written by Tony Joe White/Ed and Sally Bruce) and an answer song to the Waylon Jennings/Willie Nelson hit.

"Call Me Insane" was recorded in Austin by Watson and his touring band, "His Lone Stars": Don Pawlak (pedal steel), Mike Bernal (drums and percussion), and Chris Crepps (upright bass and background vocals). Watson played electric guitar throughout. They were joined in the studio by Danny Levin on piano, Jon Blondell (trombone), Joey Colarusso (saxophone), and Ricky White (trumpet), a ka the Honky-tonk horn section. Maines added acoustic guitar.

"Doing over 300 shows a year and a plethora of recording projects through the years, the Lone Stars are a part of me as much as my right hand" Watson said. "They know what I want them to play on my songs before I even know."

"Having known Lloyd over 20 years and worked with him as a musician, I knew he was a great guy and picker," Watson says. "But having Lloyd produce your record is like letting your mom in your kitchen. You know you gonna like what comes out and it's amazing how such basic ingredients can be made even better. He is an artists' artist."

"I've been a Dale Watson fan since I played steel guitar on some of his early records," Maines said. "My early musical influences are the same as Dale's. We both grew up playing 'real' country music. Dale is one of a very short list of today's artists who still keeps it 'real country.' I'm honored that he asked me to produce his new record. I think he knew that I would maintain the integrity of his passion for the music."

More news for Dale Watson

CD reviews for Dale Watson

Under the Influence CD review - Under the Influence
With "Under The Influence," Dale Watson pays homage to artists who have helped create his sound by covering songs that display his veneration for traditional country, western swing and early rock and roll. With the opening "Lonely Blue Boy," a 1960 rock and roll hit for Conway Twitty, Watson salutes not only Twitty, but also gives a nod to Elvis Presley (who had recorded an unissued version of the song in 1958). The rock influence is also evident on Little Richard's »»»
Live At The Big T Roadhouse, Chicken S#!+ Bingo Sunday CD review - Live At The Big T Roadhouse, Chicken S#!+ Bingo Sunday
For years, the Texas-based country music traditionalist Dale Watson and his ace backing band, the Lonestars, have hosted Chicken Shit Bingo Sunday performances - shows that get their name from a game of chance featuring a caged hen, chicken feed and a grid with numbers. At these legendary local shows, patrons buy tickets for spaces on the grid, and the recently-fed chicken determines the winner when nature calls. Chicken Shit Bingo Sundays got their start at Ginny's Little Longhorn Saloon »»»
Call Me Insane CD review - Call Me Insane
Dale Watson continually finds new ways to express old suspicions, judgments and wishes, but always stays comfortably within his self-coined Ameripolitan wheelhouse. Not that there is anything safe or staid about Watson's approach on "Call Me Insane." Since signing with Red House a few years back, Watson has been on a true high; one didn't realize the elevation Watson was capable of achieving when surrounded by the right, supportive people. Watson's take on Tony Joe »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Cantrell continues to satisfy – Laura Cantrell may never be a country star. Not at this stage of her career when she's 50, touring here and there and releasing new music every few years or so. But five albums in, Cantrell continues as a warm, enjoyable and worthy purveyor of her brand of country. That would mean going towards a more traditional side, not rushing the songs... »»»
Concert Review: Not only is Turner traditional, he's popular – Every time Josh Turner reached for some of those wonderful subterranean low notes, which he often pulled out during his enjoyable night show, it was like a superhero applying a superpower. He didn't need this extra advantage to please his audience; he has so many quality songs stockpiled in his catalogue already doing the job.... »»»
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