Sign up for newsletter

Lynne imagines new CD

Friday, February 20, 2015 – Shelby Lynne will release her 13th full-length album, and first for Rounder Records, "I Can't Imagine," on May 5.

Comprising 10 new songs written or co-written by Lynne, the disc reflects her influences - from Southern soul, Crescent City R&B, and California country and western to the social consciousness of precursors like Woody Guthrie and the roots 'n blues vocalizing of Billie Holiday.

The Virginia-born, Alabama-bred Lynne - who has lived in Southern California for the last 16 years - went to the Dockside Studio in Maurice, La. As she has on four of her last five albums (the exception being the 2008 Dusty Springfield tribute "Just a Little Lovin'," helmed by the late Phil Ramone), Lynne produced the new album herself.

Besides five songs composed alone by Lynne, the album includes two tracks ("Love is Strong" and "Be in the Now") co-written by Ron Sexsmith and three authored with Lynne's band mates -- "Better" and "I Can't Imagine" with guitarist/keyboardist Pete Donnelly and "Sold the Devil (Sunshine)" with Los Angeles-based guitarist (and band leader) Ben Peeler. The other core band members here include drummer Michael Jerome and bassist Ed Maxwell. Citizen Cope added his vocals to three tracks.

Tour dates will be announced soon.

The track listing is:
1. Paper Van Gogh (3:22)
2. Back Door Front Porch (4:31)
3. Sold the Devil (Sunshine) (4:08)
4. Son of a Gun (5:19)
5. Down Here (4:57)
6. Love Is Strong (3:44)
7. Better (4:32)
8. Be In The Now (3:28)
9. Following You (3:42)
10. I Can't Imagine (3:04)

More news for Shelby Lynne

CD reviews for Shelby Lynne

I Can't Imagine CD review - I Can't Imagine
Shelby Lynne really needs to figure out who she is if she ever wants to be something more than the answer to the trivia question "What artist won a Grammy for best new artist after releasing 6 albums over 12 years?" Is she a country singer? Blues? Is she Dusty Springfield reincarnated? Why can't she find a style and stick with it?" That's what they say anyway, but maybe they're wrong. Maybe Shelby figured out a long time ago who she was and how she wanted to sing. »»»
I Am Shelby Lynne (Deluxe Version) CD review - I Am Shelby Lynne (Deluxe Version)
The ironies surrounding Shelby Lynne's sixth album, 1999's "I Am Shelby Lynne," were as thick as mutant kudzu at the time. After a quintet of albums that garnered Lynne a ton of peer respect and negligible sales, the singer/songwriter extricated herself from a Nashville star machine that seemed determined to sculpt her talent in its witless image. Lynne moved to California, reinvented herself as herself, enlisted the talents of producer Bill Bottrell »»»
Revelatiom Road Deluxe Edition
It's been 14 years since Shelby Lynne released her soulful, country-tinged album "I Am Shelby Lynne." And over the course of that time, Lynne has had her share of ups and a few creative downs. However on this latest (reissued here with bonus tracks, a live club recording and a second live disc from London plus a DVD about the making the disc), Lynne tends to go into another soulful but equally roots-y realm on the opening title track. It's not a surprise she taps into this »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Womack planned a good night – Lee Ann Womack pretty much summed up where she's at these days in concluding her show with Don Williams "Lord I Hope This Day Is Good." The ever-strong voiced country traditionalist sang, "I don't need fortune and I don't need fame" with the concluding line of the stanza asking the Man upstairs to "plan a good day for me.... »»»
Concert Review: Cantrell continues to satisfy – Laura Cantrell may never be a country star. Not at this stage of her career when she's 50, touring here and there and releasing new music every few years or so. But five albums in, Cantrell continues as a warm, enjoyable and worthy purveyor of her brand of country. That would mean going towards a more traditional side, not rushing the songs... »»»
Follow Country Standard Time  Subscribe to Country News Digest  Follow Country Standard Time on twitter  Visit Country Standard Time on Facebook 

Elsewhere in the news

Currently at the CST blogs

Tyminski goes dark Dan Tyminski (known simply as "Tyminski" on his 2017 release "Southern Gothic") has traditional music roots and unassailable bluegrass street cred especially given his membership in Alison Krauss' Union Station. He is also a powerful songwriter and has been writing songs for himself and others for years now.... »»»
Washburn, Fleck create "Echoes" Bela Fleck and Abigail Washburn have powerhouse individual talents; each has followed an estimable career path to where they find themselves today: making complex, but spare, records, writing music together and touring with their son Juno. Their new release, "Echoes In The Valley" features mostly songs written by Fleck and Washburn, banjos, Washburn's strong vocals and very little else.... »»»
Hillman bides his time Legends don't come any more legendary than Chris Hillman. The roll call of bands that comprises Hillman's half century in music reads like a wing exhibit at the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame; Byrds, Flying Burrito Brothers, Manassas, the Souther Hillman Furay Band, the Desert Rose Band,... »»»
Seasons Change CD review - Seasons Change
"Boys from Back Home" is Scotty McCreery's amalgamation of Kenny Chesney's "I Go Back" and "Boys of Fall," which even borrows words from each hit song to create something attempting to be new. It's not new. »»»
17th Avenue Revival CD review - 17th Avenue Revival
With a group history that spans over 50 years, gospel and country music mainstays The Oak Ridge Boys are at a place when they could conceivably rest on their laurels, release a few greatest hits records and coast the rest of the way through their careers, and fans would still be pleased. »»»
Right or Wrong CD review - Right or Wrong
Dave Adkins stepped to the plate and swung for the fences. His monster swing found the sweet spot and delivered a game-winning home run. "Right or Wrong" is filled with hot picking, great vocal presentations and a risk or two that absolutely pay off. If Adkins was trying to outshine previous releases, he may have done so.  »»»
Staggered CD review - Staggered
East Nashville may be known as "the" Americana hotbed these days, but some of the talent there is very much verging on rock 'n roll. This is the case with Lynn Taylor & the BarFlies on their third release, a collection of personal tunes by the front man. »»»
Live at Club 47 CD review - Live at Club 47
When Doc Watson passed away in 2012 at the age of 89, his legacy as one of the most treasured and iconic figures of American country and folk music was embodied in nearly five decades worth of highly regarded recordings, both live and in the studio, and for many up and coming musicians... »»»
Here's to You CD review - Here's to You
It's impossible to listen to Montgomery Gentry's "Here's to You," without also feeling sad that it's the last studio album featuring Troy Gentry, who died in a helicopter crash. When they sing, "Here's to the on... »»»