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Museum honoring The Possum opens in April

Tuesday, January 13, 2015 – The George Jones Museum will open in late April in downtown Nashville, the singer's widow announced Monday.

Nancy Jones announced the museum will open the weekend of April 24, which will coincide with the second anniversary of the singer's passing (April 26).

The museum will tell the story of the singer, who was born Sept. 12, 1931 in Saratoga, Texas. Exhibits will show his development from his childhood to singing as a teenager on the streets of Galveston. There will also be documentation of his time spent serving his country in the U.S. Marines, as well as his time behind the microphone as a radio announcer for KTXJ in Jasper, Texas.

There will also be screens devoted to each era of his career. He earned his first hit in 1955 with "Why Baby Why," and continued to be a chart presence into the 2000s. Footage of Jones performances and interviews throughout his career will also be featured. Among his career highlights include the 1962 classic "She Thinks I Still Care," his marriage and recording partnership with Tammy Wynette from 1969-1975, the recording of "He Stopped Loving Her Today" in 1980, as well as his 1992 induction into the Country Music Hall of Fame.

Visitors will also get a chance to sing along with Jones in an interactive booth, and view many of his awards, Gold and Platinum records and career memorabilia. A theater will show videos of Jones performances. The museum also will have a restaurant, event space, a gift shop and a 75-foot rooftop bar overlooking the Cumberland River.

The opening weekend will feature the launch of White Lightning' Moonshine. A partnership with Silver Trail Distillery (winners of the 2012 SIP Award for best Whiskey Moonshine), the brand pays homage to the J.P. Richardson-written song of the same title, The song became Jones' first Billboard chart-topper in 1959.

The George Jones Museum will be located at 128 2nd Avenue North in downtown Nashville.

More news for George Jones

CD reviews for George Jones

The Hits CD review - The Hits
George Jones tends to rely on his past these days, so it's not surprising that "The Hits" is his new CD. The 24-song set does include a few previously unreleased songs, but that may not be enough to persuade all but the diehards to buy this. Jones recorded Eddy Raven's I Should Have Called and Al Anderson-Steven Bruton's I Ain't Ever Slowing Down about five years ago with Keith Stegall producing, and both appear here for the first time. The former is a bit poppy, »»»
Step Right Up 1970-1979: A Critical Anthology CD review - Step Right Up 1970-1979: A Critical Anthology
As retrospectives go, this new 28-track collection of George Jones' work from the 1970s is a bit of an anomaly. While most other compilations present chart-topping singles in chronological order, this single-disc set from the Australian reissue specialists at Raven Records provides an overview of Jones' total artistic output for the entire decade, regardless of chart position. This approach works well in this case because it covers songs not usually included on George Jones compilations. »»»
George Jones: Burn Your Playhouse Down, the unreleased duets CD review - George Jones: Burn Your Playhouse Down, the unreleased duets
There are few revelations in this George Jones duets collection culled primarily from "The Bradley Barn Sessions" (1993 recordings). Producers have their reasons. Perhaps the biggest surprise is when Jones is outsung by one of his duet partners, Georgette Jones, the only child of his marriage to Tammy Wynette. Georgette may have the best singing genes in history, but it is time as much as anything that pushes Dad into a subordinate role on You and Me and Time. The revelation, then, is a »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Carlile goes from excellent to memorable musical event – The last time Brandi Carlile came through town, she was promoting 2018's "By the Way, I Forgive You," which would deservedly go on to win the 2019 Grammy Award for Best Americana Album. This time out, Carlile performed fewer songs from that strong effort, which amounted to a more well-rounded live overview of her career to date.... »»»
Concert Review: Tuttle does well by coming home – Molly Tuttle has won kudos for her acoustic guitar playing. So much so that she's captured the IBMA award for Guitarist of the Year, the first female to win that acclaim from the bluegrass organization. But it's not so much Tuttle's guitar playing that stood out live. Yes, that serves her well for sure. But it's more that her... »»»
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