Sign up for newsletter
 

Kellie Coffey returns with new CD

Friday, August 3, 2007 – The future looked bright for Kellie Coffey. She had a hit single with "When You Lie Next To Me" in 2001 and was the Academy of Country Music's Top New Female of 2003, but she split with her label. But now Coffey, is back with a new independent album entitled "Walk On." The follow-up release to her debut album, "When You Lie Next to Me," was produced by Wayne Kirkpatrick (Little Big Town) and features 12 tracks, 11 co-written by Coffey. The video for the first single, "I Would Die For That," received more than 75,000 hits in four weeks on YouTube.

"We wrote songs about our life experience and what moved us," Coffey said of her co-writers. "It was probably the purest creative experience of my life."

Coffey, who gave birth since her last album, was inspired to write the powerful ballad "I Would Die For That," because of her own struggles with infertility. The video is garnering attention from around the globe as couples relate to her heartfelt, thought provoking lyrics and soaring vocals. "I've been humbled by the response and stories I've been told. This song is giving a voice to women and couples who are struggling to have a baby," said Coffey.

The title track is a soulful anthem for overcoming adversity. "Everything She Never Wanted" is about a driven career woman who finds that being a wife and mom, the things she never wanted to be, are what she really wanted to be all along. "Bandwagon" takes a lighthearted look at the modern obsession of needing to be a part of the latest craze. Dan Tyminski of Alison Krauss' Union Station provided backing vocals.

The final cut, "There You Go Again", was recorded in one take. Right after Coffey and co-writer/producer Kirkpatrick finished writing the song, they decided to cut a quick piano vocal demo. Months later when they were preparing to cut the master track, they listened down to the "demo" and decided not to touch the vocal or piano track they recorded in the inspired moments after writing the song. They simply called Jonathan Yudkin, a fiddle player and violinist, to lay down a string quartet.

Oklahoma native Coffey entered the country music scene in 2001 with her top 10 single, "When You Lie Next To Me," which remained on the chart for over a year. Her album of the same name entered the country sales chart at number five. She followed that with the top 15 single, "At the End Of The Day."

Coffey toured with Kenny Chesney for over a year on his "Senoritas and Margaritas" tour and opened for George Strait on his 2004 tour. She received a Top New Country Female American Music Award nomination and the ACM win in the same category.

CD reviews for Kellie Coffey

When You Like Next to Me
Is Kellie Coffey the reincarnation of the still quite vibrant Sara Evans? Vocally, Coffey is exceedingly close to a dead-on cover of Evans. In fact, when Coffey sings "At the End of the Day," you'd almost think Evans was the one singing it. Now that's not such a bad thing, especially since Coffey/Evans have strong, full-bodied voices. Coffey can infuse a song, like the hit title track, with the requisite emotion without sounding overwrought most of the time. "What It's Like to Be Me" is obviously »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Outlaw lives up to his name – If you're a country singer, and you use the name Outlaw as your last name, well, you'd better back it up. Los Angeles-based traditional honky tonker Sam Outlaw set the record straight, though, saying he was "going to confront it head on." He told the crowd of 45 at his Boston-area debut that he took his mom's maiden name at his stage name.... »»»
Concert Review: White follows his muse – John Paul White said he was unsure how many would bother showing up on this night. He expressed uncertainty even how big a crowd he would attract in his hometown of Florence, Ala. when this tour started a few weeks earlier. Perhaps White should not have been surprised. After all, he was one-half of the great late The Civil Wars, who turned in a... »»»
Subscribe to Country News Digest Country News Digest      Follow Country Standard Time on twitter CST      Visit Country Standard Time on Facebook CST

Elsewhere in the news

Currently at the CST blogs

Ladies and gentlemen, The Infamous Stringdusters Nearly 10 years on, The Infamous Stringdusters have carved out a singular place for themselves in the bluegrass/jamgrass world. The Stringdusters tour aggressively, are fixtures on the festival circuit and released several intriguing recording projects since late 2015: an EP of covers, including Tom Petty's "American Girl," and a full-length album of songs collaborating with some of the finest female singers in the Americana genre ("Ladies and Gentlemen").... »»»
Reams leaps into "Rhyme & Season" James Reams is one of bluegrass music's unconventional stalwarts. A son of Kentucky, Reams' journey has taken any number of unusual pathways since the mid-seventies. Producing albums for more than 20 years, Reams' ninth release of personable bluegrass, "Rhyme and Season," is a relaunch for Reams, an artist who has never followed a singular route. ... »»»
Solivan  turns to family, friends, heroes After scoring a 2015 IBMA nomination for Best Bluegrass Album for "Cold Spell," Frank Solivan tried something a little different this time around - an album of songs recorded by "Family, Friends and Heroes" (Compass). In an earlier musical life, Solivan served as stalwart in Country Current, the Navy's touring bluegrass band. Solivan left the service and formed Dirty Kitchen, a hat-tip to his background and continuing efforts as a chef.... »»»
Undercurrent CD review - Undercurrent
No longer just a startlingly talented young bluegrass musician, on her latest, Sarah Jarosz shows her growth both as a person and an artist. This is her first recording done while she wasn't in either high school or college, the first since her move to New York City three years ago, and the first time she has included only new original material. »»»
Big Day in a Small Town CD review - Big Day in a Small Town
There are two components to Brandy Clark. First is her songwriting, which gained her much street cred, penning songs for the likes of Miranda Lambert, The Band Perry, Keith Urban, Reba McEntire and a slew for Kacey Musgraves and Jennifer Nettles. And then there's her own artistic career with her major label debut finally coming close to three years after her extremely well-received (with good reason) debut, "12 Stories." »»»
EI Rio CD review - EI Rio
The rough-edged, soulful vocalist Frankie Ballard certainly receives some high-powered songwriting help on "El Rio." Chris Stapleton, considered country music's savior by some, contributes to a couple of songs, and hit makers Chris Janson and Kip Moore also each have co-writing credits on the release.  »»»