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Hiatt releases "Terms of My Surrender"

Thursday, May 29, 2014 – "Terms Of My Surrender," the title track to John Hiatt's upcoming 22nd studio album, is premiering at WSJ.com.

Hiatt attributes the title phrase to a comment an old friend once made in reference to burning the candles at both ends for years saying he was "trying to negotiate the terms of my surrendee."

"Terms Of My Surrender' is due out July 15 via New West Records. A deluxe edition will be available in the U.S. exclusively via Amazon.com, featuring a bonus DVD of 10-songs filmed live in 2013 at Hiatt's hometown venue, the Franklin Theatre in Franklin, Tenn. Along with his band The Combo, Hiatt performs some of his biggest and most beloved songs, including "Crossing Muddy Waters," "Thing Called Love" and "Have A Little Faith In Me" as well as several new ones.

For the new album production Hiatt had the idea of focusing on his vocals and guitar. Producer Doug Lancio (Patty Griffin, Jack Ingram) agreed and recorded much of the album with the full band (Lancio, Nathan Gehri, Kenneth Blevins, Brandon Young) in the room, live from the floor. The new record is musically rooted in acoustic blues, accentuated by Hiatt's soulful voice.

Hiatt and his band, The Combo, played the 2014 New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival and will be embarking on a full summer tour playing shows with both The Robert Cray Band and Taj Mahal Trio.

Songs on the CD are:
1. Long Time Comin'
2. Face Of God
3. Marlene
4. Wind Don't Have To Hurry
5. Nobody Knew His Name
6. Baby's Gonna Kick
7. Nothin' I Love
8. Terms Of My Surrender
9. Here To Stay
10. Old People
11. Come Back Home

The DVD track list is:
1. Drive South
2. Tennessee Plates
3. Crossing Muddy Waters
4. Nothin' I Love
5. Terms Of My Surrender
6. Perfectly Good Guitar
7. Feel's Like Rain
8. Thing Called Love
9. Slow Turning
10. Have A Little Faith In Me

More news for John Hiatt

CD reviews for John Hiatt

Terms of My Surrender CD review - Terms of My Surrender
As he has for decades now, John Hiatt keeps churning out quality live tours based around quality albums and songs that are hard not to love. On his latest, his seventh with his current label and his follow-up to 2012's "Mystic Pinball," Hiatt sounds like he's finally aged into his wise-beyond-his-years voice. "Are you rolling?" Hiatt is heard asking before "Face Of God" kicks in, a ramshackle crawl that sounds like it was swept off the recording floor »»»
Mystic Pinball CD review - Mystic Pinball
Over the course of his 40-year career, John Hiatt has pretty much hit for the stylistic cycle, from folk troubadour to skinny tie new wave rager to roots rock raconteur to alt.-country shitkicker to bluesy bruiser, utilizing varying degrees of his various musical personae as his songs required. Just as importantly, Hiatt has made sure to fold in elements of his tough/tender singer/songwriter side in every musical iteration he's presented, which has provided a consistent thread for his »»»
Dirty Jeans and Mudslide Hymns CD review - Dirty Jeans and Mudslide Hymns
John Hiatt is an iconic figure in the Americana music scene. Drawing upon rock, soul, country and other rootsy sounds, he wraps his neighborly vocals around his incisive lyrics in songs that are pure American. Hiatt follows up last year's "Open Road" with something of an American road album. On "Dirty Jeans," he says Adios to California, takes a Train to Birmingham and drives a Detroit Made car. He could be talking about Tennessee, Louisiana or any flooded rural area in »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Rising Appalachia buck the mainsteam, and that's fine with them – Rising Appalachia would not be accused of being in the musical mainstream. Not too many bands who combine folk and Appalachian sounds with new world music could possibly be. And that suits the sister-led duo of Chloe Smith and Leah Song just fine. In fact, at one point, Chloe made it clear she did not embrace radio play as a sign of success... »»»
Concert Review: Bingham plays with something to prove – Ryan Bingham mainly focused on songs from his sixth album "American Love Song," for this lively show. Backed by a supportive band that also included two female backup singers and a fiddler, Bingham's eclectic setlist touched upon country, singer/songwriter folk, rock and blues. Bingham reached for lively country sounds early on, with... »»»
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