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Rogers charts for seven decades

Friday, December 20, 2013 – Kenny Rogers’ latest single, “You Can’t Make Old Friends,” recently charted on the Billboard country chart at 57, giving Rogers a charted single in each of the past seven decades beginning in the 1950’s.

Rogers has also charted an album in each of the past six decades since the 1960’s. The track, which is off his Top 10 Country album "You Can’t Make Old Friends" (Warner), reunites the Rogers with long-time friend, Dolly Parton. They received their third joint Grammy nomination for “You Can't Make Old Friends” for Best Country Duo/Group Performance.

Rogers has sold more than 120 million albums worldwide during his 56 years in show business. Rogers has recorded 12 number one albums and 24 number one hits “including The Gambler,” “Lady,” “Lucille,” “Coward Of The County” and “Islands in the Stream” with Parton.

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CD reviews for Kenny Rogers

You Can't Make Old Friends CD review - You Can't Make Old Friends
Kenny Rogers has aged well, perhaps because he was already prematurely grey back when he first entered the country music realm more years ago than he'd probably care to mention. He sings, with the help of old friend Dolly Parton, on this album's title track about how you can't make old friends. And disarmingly honest lines like, "Who's going to tell me the truth?" raise this song above being just another music buddy number. The only trouble with having Parton sing a »»»
The Love of God CD review - The Love of God
There seems to be a theme among country superstars. They work their way onto the scene, burn bright, hopefully keeping the flame alive for some time. Then as their career ebbs and flows and the hits stop coming as steadily as they used to, they find themselves sitting in a studio recording a gospel record. Granted, country and gospel have always been fine bedfellows, but it just seems to be a trend that signifies that one is nearing the end of their career. "The Gambler" himself, Kenny »»»
Water and Bridges CD review - Water and Bridges
Kenny Rogers' first studio album in three years finds his gifts undiminished, with his voice resounding distinctively atop Dann Huff's country-tinged adult contemporary productions. The material sticks to the sort of contemplative mid-tempo numbers on which Rogers excels, and though the opening single (the power ballad "I Can't Unlove You") is lyrically pedestrian, there are songwriting riches to be found throughout. Walt Wilkins and Davis Raines' "Someone Somewhere Tonight" hits a high point »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Time makes a difference for Striking Matches – What a difference four months makes. When the duo Striking Matches debuted in Boston in late May, Sarah Zimmerman and Justin Davis capably showed off their skills, but somehow it felt like a lot of songs fell just a bit short. Davis and Zimmerman tended to cut a lot of songs abruptly, never letting them breath enough or fleshing them out.... »»»
Concert Review: Home Free sings out – Home Free, the Minnesota-based a capella quintet that first caught the nation's attention by winning the fourth season of NBC's reality competition The Sing-Off in 2013, is one of the most talented and unique acts in modern country music. The question has always been whether or not the group and their all-vocal style, which includes the... »»»
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