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IIIrd Tyme Out names new members

Thursday, December 5, 2013 – IIIrd Tyme out has two new band members.

Keith McKinnon on banjo and Blake Johnson on bass have joined the band replacing Steve Dilling and Edgar Loudermilk respectively.

McKinnon, a native of Marion, Va., was a member of Carrie Hassler and Hard Rain. After several years of performing with Hassler, McKinnon and his twin brother, Kevin, hit the road in 2010 with their own band Still-House. He soon secured a job behind the controls for bluegrass band, Lonesome River Band, where he's spent the last two years.

Originally from Roxboro, N.C., Johnson has been singing and playing gospel and bluegrass music since he was a young child with his family. Eventually, his bass playing and vocal style landed him his first professional job with Jay Kaczor and The Bluegrass Connection. Soon after, he helped launch The Hagar's Mountain Boys who performed for seven years together and recorded four albums. He was the guitarist and lead singer for Grasstowne for the past year.

"I am very excited about playing with a band who have been some of my favorites for a long time," said McKinnon. "The guys are all world class musicians, and Russell (Moore) is one of the greatest vocalists to ever grace a stage."

"I consider it a real honor to be joining Russell Moore and IIIrd Tyme Out," said Johnson. "I've always looked up to them as singers and musicians and I'm really looking forward to playing with these guys for a long time to come."

"When you work and travel with people in a touring band for years, not only is it a creative effort on a professional level, but you become friends with these people as well," said Moore. "Even though we are sad to see old friends depart, we are excited about the fresh, new talent, creative energy and new relationships we'll develop, both professionally and personally, with the new members. As a band, it's sometimes important to reinvent yourselves, your music and your show, to keep things exciting and fans engaged. Quite often a band member change can be the spark that lights that creative fire. I know the feel and excitement of being a new member of an established band, dating back to my days when I joined Doyle Lawson & Quicksilver. Although they are not 'new' to the bluegrass music scene, it is great to see and feel that same excitement from Keith and Blake. IIIrd Tyme Out's past has been nothing but wonderful, but have no doubt, we're even more excited about what the future holds."

Russell Moore & IIIrd Tyme Out will be unveiling their new band lineup when they perform in Galax, Va. on Jan. 4, 2014, for the Fairview Ruritan Club.

More news for IIIrd Tyme Out

CD reviews for IIIrd Tyme Out

IIIrd Tyme Out CD review - IIIrd Tyme Out
One of the best bands in bluegrass, IIIrd Tyme Out, delivers again. With material from a variety of writers, including three songs by Russell Moore and an instrumental by band-mate and ace mandolist Wayne Benson, they offer a variety of songs. Edgar Loudermilk now plays bass while Justin Haynes continues on fiddle and long-time member Steve Dilling is on banjo. Russell has one of the best lead voices in the business and drives a song hard. Hard Rock Mountain Prison is a prime example of his style. »»»
Footprints: A IIIrd Tyme Out Collection CD review - Footprints: A IIIrd Tyme Out Collection
Arguably one of the premier bluegrass bands from 1991 to the present, IIIrd Tyme Out has a huge fan base and they consistently put out great recordings and great performances. The recent departure of founding member Ray Deaton makes this retrospective release even more interesting. Not that it needed help. With 15 songs, 2 of them first releases, there's a wealth of great material here. 3TO's rendition of The Platters's top 10 hit "Only You" was released as an »»»
Back To The MAC
"More!" will be the first thing you say when you listen to IIIrd Tyme Out's return to the Mountain Arts Center CD for another live outing. Great musicians are almost a given on bluegrass recordings, and this band has some of the best. They are also blessed with one of the best lead singers in bluegrass, Russell Moore. This CD features older songs, some standards, some lesser known. They plumb the depths of emotion with an Osborne Brothers' tune, "Medals For Mother" and set your blood pumping with »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Rising Appalachia buck the mainsteam, and that's fine with them – Rising Appalachia would not be accused of being in the musical mainstream. Not too many bands who combine folk and Appalachian sounds with new world music could possibly be. And that suits the sister-led duo of Chloe Smith and Leah Song just fine. In fact, at one point, Chloe made it clear she did not embrace radio play as a sign of success... »»»
Concert Review: Bingham plays with something to prove – Ryan Bingham mainly focused on songs from his sixth album "American Love Song," for this lively show. Backed by a supportive band that also included two female backup singers and a fiddler, Bingham's eclectic setlist touched upon country, singer/songwriter folk, rock and blues. Bingham reached for lively country sounds early on, with... »»»
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