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Tweedy, Lucero contribute to Dunlap fundraiser

Friday, September 13, 2013 – Jeff Tweedy and Lucero contributed the final two tracks for the last 7-inch in the Songs for Slim series, a non-profit project created to benefit former Replacements guitarist Slim Dunlap, who is still recovering from a massive stroke he suffered last year.

To bookend the auction series, the single will be limited to 250 copies, just like the Replacements EP that got the ball rolling back in January. Like all Songs For Slim releases, this 7-inch will be beautifully packaged, hand numbered, signed by the artists and features original artwork from founding Replacements drummer Chris Mars on the picture sleeve. The auction launches Sunday, Sept. 15 at 1 p.m. eastern via SongsForSlim.com and will run until Sept. 22.

For the finale of this nine-month long series, Wilco front man Jeff Tweedy, his son Spencer Tweedy and a few friends offer up a version of Ballad Of The Opening Band, Dunlap's paean to opening acts. Recorded in Wilco's Chicago studio, Tweedy has a special connection to Dunlap appropriate for this song. In 1991, Tweedy's former band, Uncle Tupelo, opened for The Replacements on a few east coast dates.

On the flip side of the 7-inch, soulful Tennessee rockers Lucero covers Dunlap's uptempo rocker, From the Git Go. Recorded in Memphis and produced by Chris Scott, Lucero was assisted by local horn vets Jim Spake and Scott Thompson

Last month's auction of the Patterson Hood/ The Young Fresh Fellows single was another rousing success. Almost 350 bidders raised $7,185 for Dunlap and his family.

A CD compilation of all the various Songs For Slim releases (plus exciting bonus tracks) is nearing completion. More details will be announced soon.

CD reviews for Lucero

All a Man Should Do CD review - All a Man Should Do
You'd think Lucero would be bigger than they are now. After all, with a dozen albums to their credit and 15 years of roadwork behind them, they've certainly paid their dues any way you look at it. It's been nearly 10 years since their story was spotlighted in the documentary "Dreaming in America," a film that provided an unblemished look at what life is like for a hard working band whose only reward is the joy of playing before appreciative fans, and yet wider recognition »»»
1372 Overton Park CD review - 1372 Overton Park
If charcoal could sing, it'd sound like vocalist/songwriter/guitarist Ben Nichols of Lucero: driven by a steady heat that can flare up when needed, and raw-throated from the smoke. It's a voice that fits the Memphis quartet's sound, which places them on the roughed- and rocked-up outer fringes of alt.-country's back forty alongside the likes of fellow rule-breakers Two Cow Garage and the periodically resurrected Slobberbone. And it fits Nichols' stories, which tend to »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Lots to like about McKenna (when you could hear her) – Lori McKenna had lots of reasons to be in a good mood. First off, the opening band, a pop act called teenender included two of her sons. In two days, her 11th disc, "The Tree" would be released to glowing reviews. So it would seem that this homecoming show was the ideal setting with all five kids, her husband, siblings, cousins, people who... »»»
Concert Review: With Sugarland, the wait was worth it – A few songs into Sugarland's show, Kristian Bush referenced the band's five-year gap between tours saying, "A lot of people think Jennifer and I have been on a five-year vacation. Actually, we've been very busy." Clearly a lot of that time was spent in rehearsal. The duo put on a two-hour high energy gem that started out big... »»»
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Elsewhere in the news

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The Tree CD review - The Tree
It's difficult to know where to start when praising Lori McKenna's "The Tree." It's so good in so many ways. Artists like Little Big Town and Tim McGraw have benefited greatly from recording McKenna songs, yet it's unlikely many mainstream country music fans recognize her name. »»»
Famous CD review - Famous
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