Sign up for newsletter
 

Old Crow asked to join Opry

Sunday, August 18, 2013 – Old Crow Medicine Show was invited to join the Grand Ole Opry on Saturday by Opry member and friend Marty Stuart during the group's concert at the Ohio Theatre in Cleveland, Ohio.

The group will formally be inducted into the Opry at the Grand Ole Opry House in Nashville on Sept. 17.

Among the group's first performances in Nashville were on the sidewalks outside the Opry House in summer 2000, playing for fans entering and exiting Opry performances. The band graduated to the Opry stage for its official Opry debut on Jan. 13, 2001.

Near the end of the concert, Stuart surprised the group on stage, saying, "In 1925, there was a show started in Nashville called the Grand Ole Opry. It was founded on a traditional fiddle tune. It was founded on hard-hitting old time music. It was founded on being a good-natured riot. And it's been going on for 88 years. It's a great American story. Would you all consider becoming a part of this great American story and becoming Grand Ole Opry members?"

Old Crow members answered with a resounding yes and hands in the air while the sold-out crowd responded with a standing ovation. Stuart and the band then combined forces on We Don't Grow Tobacco before the band launched into its signature crowd favorite, Wagon Wheel.

"From our humble beginnings on street corners to finding acclaim on stages worldwide, our eyes have always been on one prize in particular. More than anything else Old Crow Medicine Show has wanted to be a part of the Grand Ole Opry, " said OCMS fiddler Ketch Secor. "To join the company of those brilliant, bright stars who first shot across Country Music's most celestial stage - Roy Acuff, Deford Bailey, Uncle Dave Macon, Maybelle Carter, Sarah Cannon - is the finest company that any picker could ever hope to keep."

"Inviting Old Crow to become our next member is truly exciting for us," said Pete Fisher, Opry vice president and general manager. "For one, Old Crow has grown before our eyes from entertaining Opry-goers for free in the Opry Plaza a dozen years ago to rank today among the most respected and popular acts in music. The band leaves the audience wanting more every time it takes the Opry stage, or any stage."

"It's also exciting that in many ways Old Crow looks and sounds a lot like some of the string bands of the 1920s, which helped first propel the Opry to national prominence," Fisher said. "While recent Opry inductees and contemporary hit-makers such as Darius Rucker, Keith Urban, Carrie Underwood and Dierks Bentley, will help shape the Opry in coming years, our future is also in excellent hands with this group, which happens to be quite reminiscent of our musical past. It's an awesome full circle."

More news for Old Crow Medicine Show

CD reviews for Old Crow Medicine Show

Volunteer CD review - Volunteer
Dave Cobb produced "Volunteer" for Old Crow Medicine Show, and while word on the street was that this promised to be a more rocking, less roots music effort, such talk shouldn't dissuade fans of the group's established sound from checking it out. Sure, there may be a little more electric guitar than on past efforts, but this is still very much OCMS music. While rock and roll is not the best term for these songs, perhaps rambunctious best describes some of them. »»»
50 Years of Blonde on Blonde CD review - 50 Years of Blonde on Blonde
Whenever an artist attempts to cover a classic work in whole, it can't help but seem like a somewhat audacious effort from the outset. After all, tackling an album that's stood the test of time, one that's already an integral part of the musical lexicon in its original form, is a formidable task. At best, the original artist's imprint is difficult to supersede, but at worst it can become a regrettable error that yields disastrous results. Consequently, credit Old Crow »»»
Remedy CD review - Remedy
Old Crow Medicine Show returned with "Carry Me Back" in 2012 after a brief hiatus and lineup changes. The album was a predictable collection from the group, hearkening back to their earlier releases and stepping away from the dark undertones of the highlight "Tennessee Pusher" album. It was a welcome recording for long time fans of the group, but blended in with much of their discography. "Remedy" is easily recognizable as an OCMS recording, but this time around, »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Stapleton shows his traditional roots – Chris Stapleton's All-American Road show feels like a singular mission to rid the genre of the bro country scourge that has plagued it for years. He came out with a blazing one-two punch of "Second One To Know" and "Without Your Love" and packed a stadium sized onslaught into a 9,000-seat arena. He never once veered from his... »»»
Concert Review: Jinks wins over fans, especially new ones – Cody Jinks asked the crowd a bit into his show how many had never seen him before. It seemed like Jinks has made a lot of musical inroads into the public's consciousness because roughly three quarters of the audience raised their hands to show that this was their first time. That probably made Jinks feel pretty darn good about how life has been... »»»
Follow Country Standard Time  Subscribe to Country News Digest  Follow Country Standard Time on twitter  Visit Country Standard Time on Facebook 

Elsewhere in the news

Currently at the CST blogs

Willis, Robison spin "Beautiful Lie" Eleven years ago, Kelly stepped away from music. She had just finished touring on 2007's exquisite "Translated From Love" and felt the angst of being a travelling musician with family at home. At that point, Willis and her husband, musician/producer Bruce Robison,... »»»
Chip Kinman celebrates brother, career on "Sounds Like Music" For a brief moment last summer, the news of Tony Kinman's death was, if not greatly exaggerated, then at least fortuitously premature. The roots rock icon, known for his work in The Dils, Rank and File, Blackbird and Cowboy Nation with his younger brother Chip, had been diagnosed with cancer in March 2018,... »»»
Shiflett learns "Hard Lessons" Until recently, Chris Shiflett took a somewhat obsessive/compulsive approach to his music career. For the past two decades, Shiflett has been the primary guitar foil for Dave Grohl in Foo Fighters; early in his tenure, Shiflett was so self-deprecatingly... »»»
Threads CD review - Threads
With "Threads," Sheryl Crow gets the all-star-guest treatment on what she says is her swang song, with each song featuring a favorite fellow artist. She seems a little too young for this kind of tribute. Nevertheless,  »»»
Let it Roll CD review - Let it Roll
Midland is more magicians than musicians. When the trio came out with their omnipresent 2017 single "Drinkin' Problem," they pulled off their first trick: a brand-new band to radio who sounded like old friends. Their sound and their look (matador »»»
While I'm Livin' CD review - While I'm Livin'
It's been 17 years since we've had a new album from Tanya Tucker, so it's a real pleasure to hear her clear throaty vocals deliver these songs with her characteristic raw emotion. Tucker knows how to get into a song and make it her own »»»
Gypsy CD review - Gypsy
Eilen Jewell's "Gypsy" opens with the ominous, mysterious "Beat the Drum," which is a swampy - and yes, gypsy - song of warning about some impending doom or other. It plays out like a softer type of vintage... »»»
Texas CD review - Texas
Rodney Crowell is a rare breed of a country songwriter. Yes, he knows how to write traditional country songs; it's just he's also a deep thinker, which requires extra effort on the part of the listener to appreciate them fully.  »»»
New Moon Over My Shoulder CD review - New Moon Over My Shoulder
Larry Sparks was still a teenager when Ralph Stanley chose him to replace his brother Carter Stanley as guitarist and lead singer in the Clinch Mountain Boys in the wake of Carter's passing in December 1966. »»»