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Tritt resurfaces, The Deadly Gentlmen debut, Murphey mixes it up

Tuesday, July 9, 2013 – Travis Tritt returns with his first disc in six years, sort of. "The Calm After..." is out today on his own label. The disc actually is a reissue of his 2007 disc, "The Storm," which embroiled the Georgia singer in a protracted lawsuit with his label Category 5. The label went under thanks to a cloud of legal issues surrounding its owner, who eventually went to jail. The disc contains two new songs, including one with his daughter, Tyler Reese, 15, who sing the Patty Smyth/Don Henley hit Sometimes Love Just Ain't Enough.

Veteran Michael Martin Murphey also releases an album, "Red River Drifter," on his own label. The music is varied including country and blues.

Boston-based quintet The Deadly Gentlemen make its Rounder debut with "Roll Me, Tumble Me." The disc, its third overall, contains 10 songs from a band including Greg Liesz on banjo, Sam Grisman on bass, mandolinist Dominick Leslie, fiddle player Mike Barnett and guitarist Stash Wyslouch.

CD reviews for The Deadly Gentlemen

Roll Me, Tumble Me CD review - Roll Me, Tumble Me
With their third release, the Boston-based the Deadly Gentlemen deliver a mix of bluegrass, folk, pop and rock. Banjoist Greg Liszt (formerly of Crooked Still and Bruce Springsteen's touring band) wrote all 10 songs for the project, including re-workings of some past compositions. Though not as overtly comical as the Austin Lounge Lizards much of Liszt's writing is humorous, including the title track (previously recorded for their 2008 album "The Bastard Masterpiece") »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: There's a lot to be said about The Felice Brothers – The Felice Brothers have soldiered on, occupying the fringes of the musical world with ups and downs. After not knowing whether the group would even continue following the departure of half of the band a few years ago, The Felice Brothers continued with a new rhythm section and a new album, "Undressed," that is heavily political.... »»»
Concert Review: Turner bring it on (to his second) home – Frank Turner opined during the first of four sold-out nights of the Lost Evenings Festival that Boston was his home away from his British home. The likable, accessible singer hit the sweet spot not only with his perspective, but his performance as well demonstrated why. Turner made a major change in this year's festival. For the first time, he... »»»
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