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So goes Hootie, so goes Steve Azar

Sunday, July 1, 2007 – A knee infection to Darius Rocker, lead singer of Hootie & the Blowfish, resulted in tour dates being postponed until mid-July, and that means opening act Steve Azar was also left without a show.

Azar's previously announced tour dates with Hootie & the Blowfish have been postponed until further notice, according to his publicist. Rucker recently suffered a staph infection in his left knee and has since undergone surgery to clear the infection. His post-operative rehabilitation will prevent him from performing through mid-July, forcing the delay of their summer concert tour. Plans are in the works to reschedule the dates.

Earlier this year, Azar opened shows for Bob Seger.

More news for Steve Azar

CD reviews for Steve Azar

Waitin' On Joe
It's been a long time since Steve Azar was heard from - a record at the failed River North label was the last time. But out of the shoot, the Mississippian is doing quite fine with a big hit single, but there is more than one catchy, but quality song on the full length. Azar, who wrote every song, many with producer Rafe Van Hoy, shines on "Damn the Money." The acoustically-based song , in effect, the guitar player, the bank teller and the story teller to live the way they want without worrying about greenbacks. »»»
Heartbreak Town
Steve Azar has the looks and voice, but he needs some different material. It's not bad, and the crowd at a live performance would be tapping their toes, but it's not strong enough to carry its weight on radio. The hooks just aren't there, and the riffs don't stick with you. This is definitely new country - more Billy Joel than Billy Anderson. Then you get to "As Long As Harley Gets To Play" with a killer lap steel; too bad he doesn't turn it loose. Imagine a fusion of Jim Croce and a mellow John »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Womack planned a good night – Lee Ann Womack pretty much summed up where she's at these days in concluding her show with Don Williams "Lord I Hope This Day Is Good." The ever-strong voiced country traditionalist sang, "I don't need fortune and I don't need fame" with the concluding line of the stanza asking the Man upstairs to "plan a good day for me.... »»»
Concert Review: Cantrell continues to satisfy – Laura Cantrell may never be a country star. Not at this stage of her career when she's 50, touring here and there and releasing new music every few years or so. But five albums in, Cantrell continues as a warm, enjoyable and worthy purveyor of her brand of country. That would mean going towards a more traditional side, not rushing the songs... »»»
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