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Brad Paisley gets in tune with "Online" video

Monday, June 25, 2007 – Fresh off the release of "5th Gear" and the disc's chart-topping first single, "Ticks," Brad Paisley will premier his new music video for the second single, "Online," tomorrow on iTunes where it will be available for purchase.

Paisley said, "I think it's great because finally there's a place where you can buy a music video. Everybody's always wondered about that. In the beginning of my career - like 1999, 2000 - we would do these videos, and (fans) would say, 'Where can I get that?' And you couldn't get it anywhere."

Blending Paisley's trademark humor and musicianship, the video for "Online" reunites Paisley with William Shatner and Jason Alexander (who also directed), both of whom appeared in the video for his 2003 chartbuster, "Celebrity." Mixing concert footage with a bevy of special guests (including Maureen McCormick; Estelle Harris, Alexander's TV mom on Seinfeld; and Paisley tourmates Kellie Pickler and Taylor Swift), the video follows the laugh-out-loud storyline of how easy it is to hide your shortcomings and be "so much cooler online."

"This is really cool - it's almost like a sitcom, you know? You've got Jason Alexander, who I adore, who just acted really well in this and then directed everybody, including himself, and came up with a vision for this and brought great performances out of William Shatner and Estelle Harris and Maureen McCormick and a lot of these people. And you've got Taylor and Kellie who are a great addition to this, too, and (help make it) neat to have. We had a ball making this."

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Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: The Jayhawks remain in top form – It's usually a good time to catch a band right after they've released one of their better albums, and "Paging Mr. Proust" is one of The Jayhawks' best. Comprised of smart songs, which consistently put lead singer Gary Louris' engaging vibrato to proper use and instrumental textures that oftentimes stretch the Minnesota act... »»»
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