Sign up for newsletter
 

Americana conference gets underway

Wednesday, September 12, 2012 – The Americana Music Festival gets underway today in Nashville, an annual event celebrating the musical genre.

The 11th annual Americana Honors & Awards, presented by Nissan takes place tonight at the Ryman.

The performer list includes Bonnie Raitt, Alabama Shakes, Booker T. Jones, Carolina Chocolate Drops, Deep Dark Woods, Hayes Carll with Cary Ann Hearst, Guy Clark, Jason Isbell and the 400 Unit, John Hiatt, Justin Townes Earle, Kasey Chambers & Shane Nicholson, Punch Brothers, Tom T. Hall with Lee Ann Womack and Peter Cooper, Robert Ellis, Sarah Jarosz, The Mavericks, Richard Thompson and an all-star finale tribute to Levon Helm.

Award presenters include The Civil Wars, Patterson Hood, Sara Watkins, Brandi Carlile, Amy Helm, Sam Bush, Bruce Robison & Kelly Willis, Allison Moorer, Rodney Crowell, Mike Mills, Jody Stephens and The Wallflowers.

The event airs live on AXS TV, NPR.org, Sirius/XM and WSM (8 p.m. eastern). "Austin City Limits," will broadcast an edited special November 10th. Voice of America, and Bob Harris of BBC2 will broadcast overseas in the following weeks.

Jim Lauderdale will host again with Buddy Miller serving as the band leader of the All-Star Band that includes Don Was, Rami Jaffee, Brady Blade and Larry Campbell.

The awards show kicks off the festival with more than 100 official showcases throughout Music City. The festival also includes panel sessions including an interview with Bonnie Raitt.

More news for Americana Music Association

Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Long wait ends for Kitty, Daisy & Lewis – When you don't show for almost six years - Kitty, Daisy & Lewis are guilty as charged - and barely release any music unless counting one excellent disc out in late March on a British label and something almost unheard in the states in 2011, don't expect the masses to show up either. Predictably, that didn't happen for the family band... »»»
Concert Review: Mellencamp overcomes conundrum – John Mellencamp faces the predicament that artists of his stature must face as they age. Now 63 and still putting out new, quality albums, Mellencamp presumably wants to push his new highly relevant music, while the faithful, long-time supporters thrive on the old stuff. How do you rectify the two? Mellencamp tended to have it both ways before a... »»»
Subscribe to Country News Digest Country News Digest      Follow Country Standard Time on twitter CST      Visit Country Standard Time on Facebook CST

Elsewhere in the news

Currently at the CST blogs

Giddens takes her turn A great deal has transpired in the 10 years between Rhiannon Giddens, Dom Flemons and Justin Robinson connecting at North Carolina's Black Banjo Gathering and the release of Giddens' brilliant debut solo album, "Tomorrow is My Turn." Giddens and Flemons formed the very successful Sankofa Springs. Robinson met and was mentored by black string band legend Joe Thompson, and ultimately, Giddens, Flemons and Robinson formed the bluegrass/folk/blues powerhouse, the Carolina Chocolate Drops. ... »»»
The perfect world of Ray Wylie Hubbard A couple of years ago, while discussing various musical poet-heroes, singer-songwriter Hayes Carll mused that "in a perfect world, Ray Wylie Hubbard would be winning Grammys." With the release of his latest offering, "The Ruffian's Misfortune," a follow-up to 2012's critically acclaimed, "The Grifter's Hymnal," now might just be the time that Carll was talking about.... »»»
Nathan Stanley carries on family tradition Young bluegrass artist Nathan Stanley doesn't fall far from the branches of the family tree; he honors the legacy of his grandfather, Dr. Ralph Stanley, by delivering straight ahead traditional bluegrass music, interpreting old classics that have shaped him and his music. At the same time, young Stanley is an original, refusing to sing the old songs in the ways they've been performed before. "If it's been done," he says, "I don't think I'll do it that way."... »»»