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Americana conference gets underway

Wednesday, September 12, 2012 – The Americana Music Festival gets underway today in Nashville, an annual event celebrating the musical genre.

The 11th annual Americana Honors & Awards, presented by Nissan takes place tonight at the Ryman.

The performer list includes Bonnie Raitt, Alabama Shakes, Booker T. Jones, Carolina Chocolate Drops, Deep Dark Woods, Hayes Carll with Cary Ann Hearst, Guy Clark, Jason Isbell and the 400 Unit, John Hiatt, Justin Townes Earle, Kasey Chambers & Shane Nicholson, Punch Brothers, Tom T. Hall with Lee Ann Womack and Peter Cooper, Robert Ellis, Sarah Jarosz, The Mavericks, Richard Thompson and an all-star finale tribute to Levon Helm.

Award presenters include The Civil Wars, Patterson Hood, Sara Watkins, Brandi Carlile, Amy Helm, Sam Bush, Bruce Robison & Kelly Willis, Allison Moorer, Rodney Crowell, Mike Mills, Jody Stephens and The Wallflowers.

The event airs live on AXS TV, NPR.org, Sirius/XM and WSM (8 p.m. eastern). "Austin City Limits," will broadcast an edited special November 10th. Voice of America, and Bob Harris of BBC2 will broadcast overseas in the following weeks.

Jim Lauderdale will host again with Buddy Miller serving as the band leader of the All-Star Band that includes Don Was, Rami Jaffee, Brady Blade and Larry Campbell.

The awards show kicks off the festival with more than 100 official showcases throughout Music City. The festival also includes panel sessions including an interview with Bonnie Raitt.

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