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Williams rants against President

Thursday, July 12, 2012 – Hank Williams continued going off against President Obama, this time in a Rolling Stone interview, in which the singer charged the president "hates America in the first place."

Williams, who released a new disc, "Old School, New Rules," on Tuesday, previously got into hot water when he knocked the golf game between the president and House Speaker John Boehner, saying, "It'd be like Hitler playing golf with Netanyahu." That caused ESPN to permanently drop Williams from doing its Monday Night Football theme after 22 years.

In the Rolling Stone interview, Williams was feisty and minced no words when it came to President Obama.

Williams was asked about the song Keep the Change, where he sings "I'll keep my freedom / I'll keep my guns / I'll keep my money / and my religion too ... I will keep my Christian name and you all can keep the change."

Writer Patrick Doyle asked what he meant about the Christian name idea. "You know, we've got a President that does a call to the Koran or Mecca or whatever. That's what I meant. That's exactly what I meant. I won't be changing my name to whatever. That's exactly what I meant."

When asked of his opinion of Obama, Williams said, "I mean, it's a zero. If I was at my office and I could get to my Internet and list the things like where our economy is - you don't want to go there with me. I mean, the guy is the worst. Giveaway programs, hates America in the first place, forget about the flag."

As for why Obama hates America, Williams said, "We have borrowed ourselves into our poor grandchildren. Now my opinion has gone down. It was pretty low to start with. It's really gone down since then. I mean, there's a whole lot of us out here, we flip the tube off when that guy comes on. We're not listening and we ain't watching."

Doyle persisted, "Yeah but, why do you think he hates America?" Williams said, "Oh, you know I don't know. I don't know about that but it's kind of obvious. I guess when you take a tour, a world tour, to apologize for America. He did that, you know?

"Which tour was that?" Doyle asked.

You know, "We're sorry." Going on a world tour saying, "We're going to be be even with everyone else, we only have 6 percent of the population." Yeah. I wouldn't be going to the duck blinds with any of those guys. It was some of the greatest inspiration I ever had that because that song of mine, "We Don't Apologize for America," there's a guy named Marcus Luttrell that was a lone survivor of the Navy Seals, and he said, "I want to thank you for writing that because every military person in this country is going to buy that song." That's the ones that I care about. Barack and his? I could care less. I'm writing for the ones that mean something to me. Oh, we're pulling in here. Adios, cousin!"

More news for Hank Williams Jr.

CD reviews for Hank Williams Jr.

It's About Time CD review - It's About Time
After 70 million records and 100 charting singles, does Hank Jr. have anything left to prove? Nope, but it is after all, a family tradition - so here he is, at age 66, with his first release on a new label exclusive to Hall of Famer types (Reba, Martina McBride), looking to strike gold one more time. The Bocephus blueprint hasn't changed much since the late '80s. We've come to expect guest stars, loads of songwriters and a dip into the great American music catalog. »»»
Old School, New Rules CD review - Old School, New Rules
Hank Williams Jr. is one of those people who are as famous for their personality as their music. He has never been shy about expressing his particular opinion about anything. Bocephus never lets a chance to flaunt his political ideals pass, and his latest album is his most passionately right wing to date. The irony of the political focus is that Bocephus uses the image of the "working man" to serve as the choir for his sermon, much like Bruce Springsteen's magnificent »»»
127 Rose Avenue
Conjuring his trademark Southern rock and country blues sound, Hank Williams Jr. mines areas familiar to longtime fans. In the process, he delivers an album that boasts characteristic poignancy and drive, but occasionally falls flat. The most disappointing moments occur when the 60-year-old Williams proves too winded to convincingly chant the rapid-fire lyrics of Farm Song. The vigilantism implied in Sounds Like Justice plays out distastefully and his southern rocker about a sexy gold-digger, High »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Sweeney maintains her musical integrity – Sunny Sweeney has gone the big label route and even earned a hit with "From a Table Away," but truth be told, she's better off without the baggage of the bigs, especially given the consistent quality and musical vision that was so clearly and admirably on display on this evening. When the East Texas native started her career, she was... »»»
Concert Review: Live, Shelley proves she's the real deal – After the concert, Joan Shelley was greeted by a fan at the near sold-out club who had never seen her before. The first timer told the Louisville, Ky.-based folk-oriented singer that she wanted to see for herself if Shelley's vocals were the real deal live. The fan walked away mighty impressed -based on her comments - and it was easy to see why.... »»»
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