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Kenny Chesney plans to release new single from forthcoming CD

Wednesday, May 30, 2007 – Currently in the studio between dates, finishing the follow-up to the triple platinum The Road & The Radio, Kenny Chesney will release "Never Wanted Nothing More" as the first single. The song was written by bluegrasser Ronnie Bowman and Chris Stapleton.

"Only in country music can you get laid and saved, all within three minutes," Chesney said. "And the thing about the song...it really is how life is lived, what we want and the way nothing else feels like that moment when you finally get it."

The song leans heavily on banjo, acoustic guitars and a staccato beat.

"I'm really lucky, because my fans are music lovers - and they let me do all kinds of things. It keeps it exciting for everybody," said Chesney. "This song isn't maybe what people are expecting, but then the best things never are."

BNA is going to simultaneously download every radio station in America on Monday, June 4th. The instantaneous service means the music will be available for airplay just as the Flip Flop Summer Tour heads into the NFL Stadiums in 6 major markets, starting in Pittsburgh June 9.

"To me, all the way back to when I was writing songs at Acuff Rose, learning from people like Dean Dillon and Whitey Shaffer, it's about the songs," Chesney said. "And we've got some great ones for this next album. The hardest part was figuring out where to start with which song to release first from this new record, but the good news is there's plenty of great music to come. And I'm ready 'cause as good as the last couple have been, this is a whole other level for us."

More news for Kenny Chesney

CD reviews for Kenny Chesney

Life on a Rock CD review - Life on a Rock
Despite the carefree, cruise-line posture of most Kenny Chesney records, there's always a nagging suspicion that his party-time vibe is about as predictable as a plastic pink flamingo on a Palm Beach patio. Yet Chesney's career-long theme of girls, guitars, beer and beaches (not always in that order) - and the occasional piece of farm machinery - has yet to wear thin. And with summer fast approaching, that's okay. Chesney's latest is something of a running journal of his »»»
Welcome to the Fishbowl CD review - Welcome to the Fishbowl
Kenny Chesney is synonymous with all things summer and good times. "Welcome to the Fishbowl" is a radical departure. If you're going to drink a beer and listen to this album, you may need a Prozac chaser. It is a bit short on fun as Chesney deals with terminal illnesses, loss of privacy and lost love. It leads off with the catchy Come Over, which is in the same vein as Lady A's Need You Now. On Sing 'Em My Good Friend, a man selling an old guitar full of memories »»»
Hemingway's Whiskey CD review - Hemingway's Whiskey
There are two warring sides to Kenny Chesney's musical personality. There's the part of him that wants to record throwaway, beach bum anthems like Coastal. However, the singer's better half excels at ballads like Where I Grew Up. The latter song contrasts youthful foolish behaviors with events that add quality real world experiences to a life. Drinking beer with high school buddies may have made him feel like a man, but it was a drunk-driving accident that grew him up - but fast. »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: MerleFest showcases diversity on day two – Although primarily thought of as a "roots music" festival, the artists at MerleFest can and do come from a variety of genres and locales. On the first full day of this year's festival, that point was underscored with performances from not just bluegrass and string bands, but also rock 'n' roll, soul and international acts... »»»
Concert Review: MerleFest opening night showcases new and familiar Artists – Long running North Carolina roots music festival MerleFest is a family friendly affair that has proven to have appeal to different generations. The lineup for Thursday's opening night, then, could be seen as a mirror to that audience as it contained artists ranging from multiple-year veterans of the festival down to first-year rookies.... »»»
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