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Moore notches first number one

Thursday, May 24, 2012 – Kip Moore scored the first number one single of his career with Somethin' 'Bout a Truck on the Billboard Country Songs chart for the week ending June 2. The Georgia native took over the top of the chart from Jason Aldean's Fly Over States, which slipped to second. On the CD chart, Carrie Underwood led the way with "Blown Away."

Elsewhere on the song chart, Zac Brown Band moved up one to third with No Hurry. Eric Church moved up two to fourth with Springsteen, while Underwood's hit, Good Girl was up one to fifth. Luke Bryan has another big hit on his hands with Drunk On You, up three to sixth.

Toby Keith was at 11 with Beers Ago, up 3. Dierks Bentley also moved up 3 - to 16 - with 5-1-5-0. Kenny Chesney debuted at 24 with Come Over.

On the album chart, Lionel Richie and Luke Bryan stayed two-three with "Tuskegee" and "tailgates & tanlines" respectively. Willie Nelson debuted in fourth with "Heroes." Church was fifth with "Chief."

Hunter Hayes' self-titled debut was at 19, up 3. Eli Young Band was up 4 to 21 with "Life At Best." Pistol Annies also climbed 4 - to 22 - with "Hell on Heels." Chris Young's "Neon" jumped 5 to 23. Justin Moore was at 26 with "Outlaws Like Me," up 5. "Number One Hits" from Tim McGraw was at 27, up 3. "Icon: George Strait" was 28th, up 4. "Icon: Billy Currington" jumped 6 places to 29. Florida George Line debuted at 35 with "It'z Just What We Do." "NOW That's What I Call Country Ballads" moved up 4 to 38.

On the bluegrass album chart, Trampled by Turtles remained first with "Stars and Satellites." "The Gospel Side of Dailey & Vincent" remained second. Punch Brothers were third with "Who's Feeling Young Now? Alison Krauss & Union Station were fourth with "Paper Airplane," while Carolina Chocolate Drops stood in fifth with "Leaving Eden."

On the overall top 200, Underwood was 3rd, Richie 9th, Bryan 14th, Nelson 18th and Church 22nd.

More news for Kip Moore

CD reviews for Kip Moore

Underground CD review - Underground
Claiming to have too many songs to choose from, Kip Moore's solution to his surplus was to release "Underground," an EP. "Everywhere we go the fans keep asking for the recordings of these underground songs that they've been hearing for the last few years," he said. "They're a passionate fan base so I decided to ask my label if I could record these songs live and give them the raw recordings." Moore co-wrote all five tracks, which include two studio »»»
Wild Ones CD review - Wild Ones
Kip Moore's sophomore release has been a long time in coming - 3 1/2 years - a surprise considering how well he did with his debut, "Up All Night," and its big hits ("Somethin' 'Bout a Truck," "Beer Money"). Moore has said he spent time expanding his sound - and he surely has done that - although two failed singles doubtlessly didn't help. While "Up All Night" veered towards the rootsier side and would not have been confused with »»»
Up All Night CD review - Up All Night
Kip Moore's debut, "Up All Night" may be out now, but he is no newbie. He wrote two songs on Thompson Square's debut before surfacing with his singleMary Was the Marrying Kind. Kiefer Thompson returned the favor by co-writing the opener Drive Me Crazy, a teenage romance number with infectious melody. Moore said he thinks fans still have a lot to learn about him and the depth of "Up All Night." "They'll be surprised from the single. It's a very emotional record. »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Avett Brothers come home – For the 30th anniversary of the "Traditional Plus" MerleFest music festival, there might not be a more appropriate act to anchor the opening night than the Avett Brothers. Born of a desire to bring rock 'n' roll energy to traditional music and formed by devotees to Doc Watson, The Avetts may have outgrown their acoustic roots over... »»»
Concert Review: Turnpike Troubadours leave no doubt – Turnpike Troubadours have not released an album since mid-September 2015. Don't look for any new release hitting the streets any day now either. The last time the Oklahoma-based band played Boston, they were in a pretty, 1,200-seat theatre. So, one could have been outwardly skeptical about the band when it downsized to a venue on the outskirts... »»»
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Currently at the CST blogs

The Avett Brothers come home to MerleFest For The Avett Brothers, MerleFest is a coming home of sorts. This year's edition of the MerleFest "traditional-plus" music festival in Wilkesboro, N.C., the event's 30th anniversary, a milestone sure to be marked by many different special appearances and commemorations during the festival's four-day run, is no exception.... »»»
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The Harmed Brothers CD review - The Harmed Brothers
Let's put it succinctly. The Harmed Brothers may be the best band no one has ever heard of. Well, maybe that's an exaggeration. They do have their ardent admirers, so let's not discount their following entirely. Still, for those who are unaware, the band's new eponymous effort ought to make it clear that this is a group with a wealth of resources at their command. »»»
West Coast Town CD review - West Coast Town
Chris Shiflett is best known as a guitarist in Foo Fighters, but he's also has some authentic traditional country in his bones. Inspired, in part, by much of the fine vintage country music created in California, "West Coast Town" lets Shiflett show off his country music skills. »»»
Something's Going On CD review - Something's Going On
Trace Adkins' wonderful low singing voice can be a little deceptive because he could easily sing utter crap and still somehow sound great. It's why the critical ear must pay close attention to specifically what he's saying in his songs whenever evaluating his work. Adkins doesn't write his own songs, so he's entirely dependent upon stellar writers.  »»»
Patriots & Poets CD review - Patriots & Poets
From time to time an album comes along with exactly the right message and meaning at exactly the right time - "Patriots & Poets" is one of those albums. Dailey and Vincent initially set out to create a project full of songs they had written independently, together and with close friends. While succeeding mightily in that regard, they also created a beautiful love letter to America and her people... »»»
WildHorse CD review - WildHorse
Someone needs to inform karma that Raelynn is not getting what she deserves. It takes a lot of work to mess this equation up: national TV exposure (from "The Voice"), a monster hit (2014's "God Made Girls") and famous friends who've practically adopted you (like Blake Shelton). This is all atop her twangy Texan charm and very capable singer/songwriter chops. »»»
Way Out West CD review - Way Out West
Marty Stuart's "Way Out West" is, in part, his tribute to the music of California. The title cut gets straight to the point with a psychedelic journey song, which is as much a warning against drug abuse as it is a physical trip to the golden state. "Time Don't Wait" alludes to much of the garage rock that came out of California '60s, and more specifically points back to The Byrds' heyday with its glorious jangling Rickenbacker guitar part.  »»»