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For Underwood, kids will have to wait

Wednesday, April 25, 2012 – Don't expect Carrie Underwood to take a break from her career to raise a family, just yet. At least that's what she says on Nightline tonight.

"To be honest, one day I'm absolutely fine and happy and, you know, start legitimately thinking about the idea of having kids, and another day, I'm like 'oh gosh, no, no, what?' I can barely keep my own schedule straight. I see moms who are wives, who work and juggle all these things, and how they must be better time managers than I am," said Underwood.

The singer, whose new disc, "Blown Away," comes out next Tuesday, married pro hockey player Mike Fisher in 2010.

"Right now in my life, I'm smart enough to know that I'm a selfish person right now, and I can be, and that's okay," Underwood says. "There's nothing wrong with that. At least I recognize it."

"That's a big step," she said. "It's like moving away from home. It's really scary until you do it, and then you figure it out," the singer added.

Fischer plays for the local Nashville Predators. But the two go stretches without seeing each other. The idea of straying doesn't worry Underwood. "I know he loves me, and I know he loves God. And he wouldn't do that to either one of us," she said. "Every guy I've ever dated before Mike, somewhere in the back of my head, I would always, not have trust issues, I've never been the kind of the person to check text messages...bust into his email account. With Mike, it never crosses my mind."

Underwood talked about the new disc in the interview including the song Forever Changed. Underwood described the song as being about a woman, who is married with children, coming to the end of her life. One of the writers wrote the song about his mother who had Alzheimer's, but Underwood said she thinks of her grandmother's death.

"I get emotional even talking about this song to be honest. It's just beautiful," Underwood said. "It just becomes very real...and I remember my grandmother at the end of her life, looking at my dad and thinking that that was my grandfather."

"I can never sing this song, like on stage in front of people. I could barely get through it in the studio," she said.

More news for Carrie Underwood

CD reviews for Carrie Underwood

Storyteller CD review - Storyteller
Carrie Underwood's powerful voice has been her calling card throughout her career, and that is no different on her latest. She has always possessed a voice that can be chameleon-like and work with the material at hand. Underwood does that again on these 13 songs, 6 of which she helped pen. Underwood knows a thing or two about writing or finding material that fits her commercial orientation as almost all 13 could conceivably be picked as singles. They are big sounding, big voiced and radio ready. »»»
Greatest Hits: Decade #1 CD review - Greatest Hits: Decade #1
Greatest hits albums are often derided as creative placeholders, or worse yet, contractual obligations. In Carrie Underwood's case, the album subtitled "Decade #1" is a chance to take a somewhat awe inspired look at what a successful career this American Idol alumnus has already had to date. One of its two new songs, the single "Something in the Water," is a wonderfully gutsy move on Underwood's part. Country is one of the rare genres where a Christian can sing of »»»
Blown Away CD review - Blown Away
Carrie Underwood's calling card remains intact - her ultra strong set of pipes. "Blown Away" is almost a tale of two CDs. The first half or so tends to be far more pop oriented and at times rocks, while the other half veers far more towards country and even gets traditional on a song or two. The lead-off hit first single, Good Girl, rocks far more than anything else. It sounds good, catchy, but with Underwood singing hard, the song is geared for arena rock, not anything remotely »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: The Surly Gentlemen prove anything but – For about the past six months, veteran bluegrassers Clay Hess, formerly of Kentucky Thunder, and Tim Shelton of NewFound Road, along with Clay's son Brennan, have collectively been The Surly Gentlemen. The trio's sound is probably best described as stripped down bluegrass meets singer/songwriter. These Surly Gents have been playing small... »»»
Concert Review: Dustbowl Revival leads just another typical night in Music City – The Station Inn is Nashville's self-styled "World Famous" venue for bluegrass and roots music for over 40 years. Over time, the area around The Station Inn (much like the rest of Nashville) has changed, swapping gritty and sweaty for shiny and slick. The area, known as The Gulch, now features shopping and restaurants, with little of the... »»»
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