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For Underwood, kids will have to wait

Wednesday, April 25, 2012 – Don't expect Carrie Underwood to take a break from her career to raise a family, just yet. At least that's what she says on Nightline tonight.

"To be honest, one day I'm absolutely fine and happy and, you know, start legitimately thinking about the idea of having kids, and another day, I'm like 'oh gosh, no, no, what?' I can barely keep my own schedule straight. I see moms who are wives, who work and juggle all these things, and how they must be better time managers than I am," said Underwood.

The singer, whose new disc, "Blown Away," comes out next Tuesday, married pro hockey player Mike Fisher in 2010.

"Right now in my life, I'm smart enough to know that I'm a selfish person right now, and I can be, and that's okay," Underwood says. "There's nothing wrong with that. At least I recognize it."

"That's a big step," she said. "It's like moving away from home. It's really scary until you do it, and then you figure it out," the singer added.

Fischer plays for the local Nashville Predators. But the two go stretches without seeing each other. The idea of straying doesn't worry Underwood. "I know he loves me, and I know he loves God. And he wouldn't do that to either one of us," she said. "Every guy I've ever dated before Mike, somewhere in the back of my head, I would always, not have trust issues, I've never been the kind of the person to check text messages...bust into his email account. With Mike, it never crosses my mind."

Underwood talked about the new disc in the interview including the song Forever Changed. Underwood described the song as being about a woman, who is married with children, coming to the end of her life. One of the writers wrote the song about his mother who had Alzheimer's, but Underwood said she thinks of her grandmother's death.

"I get emotional even talking about this song to be honest. It's just beautiful," Underwood said. "It just becomes very real...and I remember my grandmother at the end of her life, looking at my dad and thinking that that was my grandfather."

"I can never sing this song, like on stage in front of people. I could barely get through it in the studio," she said.

More news for Carrie Underwood

CD reviews for Carrie Underwood

Storyteller CD review - Storyteller
Carrie Underwood's powerful voice has been her calling card throughout her career, and that is no different on her latest. She has always possessed a voice that can be chameleon-like and work with the material at hand. Underwood does that again on these 13 songs, 6 of which she helped pen. Underwood knows a thing or two about writing or finding material that fits her commercial orientation as almost all 13 could conceivably be picked as singles. They are big sounding, big voiced and radio ready. »»»
Greatest Hits: Decade #1 CD review - Greatest Hits: Decade #1
Greatest hits albums are often derided as creative placeholders, or worse yet, contractual obligations. In Carrie Underwood's case, the album subtitled "Decade #1" is a chance to take a somewhat awe inspired look at what a successful career this American Idol alumnus has already had to date. One of its two new songs, the single "Something in the Water," is a wonderfully gutsy move on Underwood's part. Country is one of the rare genres where a Christian can sing of »»»
Blown Away CD review - Blown Away
Carrie Underwood's calling card remains intact - her ultra strong set of pipes. "Blown Away" is almost a tale of two CDs. The first half or so tends to be far more pop oriented and at times rocks, while the other half veers far more towards country and even gets traditional on a song or two. The lead-off hit first single, Good Girl, rocks far more than anything else. It sounds good, catchy, but with Underwood singing hard, the song is geared for arena rock, not anything remotely »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Not playing the hit proves no problem for Bingham – Ryan Bingham may always end up being best known for collaborating with T Bone Burnett on the soundtrack for the 2009 film starring Jeff Bridges, particularly "The Weary Kind." That would not be a surprise given that he won a Grammy and Oscar for the song. One would, therefore, think that "The Weary Kind" would be one of those... »»»
Concert Review: Abbott brings the joy - even with "Front Row Seat" – To say that the Josh Abbott Band's "Front Row Seat" is an easy listen, especially in concert, would be a tremendous understatement. The Texas country singer released a five-act recording about the development, joy and ultimate dissolution of his marriage last fall. Not exactly easy subject matter, but Abbott managed to bring more than a... »»»
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