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Nelson becomes a statue

Tuesday, April 10, 2012 – Willie Nelson will get a different kind of tribute treatment this month. No covers of his tunes. Just a big statue of the singer in Austin.

The statue will be unveiled April 20. The eight-foot statue sculpted by Clete Shields is a gift from Capital Area Statues.

"Creating a sculpture of such an icon while he is still living presents its challenges," Shields said in a statement in Rolling Stone. "For many, the Willie they connect with is the Outlaw Willie of the Seventies, or the influential advocate for Farm Aid in the Eighties, while others - especially a younger generation - grew fond of him during his more mature years. The sculpture needed to appeal to a broad audience and conjure up the fond memories of so many different people."

More news for Willie Nelson

CD reviews for Willie Nelson

Band of Brothers CD review - Band of Brothers
Willie Nelson has been routinely busy since 1996 with touring, recording, writing books and more touring. Yet his latest offering is a rarity of sorts in that it's his first true studio album of primarily new material since 1996. And like so much of his material beforehand, Nelson mines very little new ground with this record. That doesn't mean it's not stellar however! The first song "Bring It On" contains all the hallmarks of a classic Nelson tune, from the »»»
To All the Girls... CD review - To All the Girls...
At 80, it would be easy for Willie Nelson to take a step back and rest on his laurels a bit. Instead, the country legend just released his third studio album in only a 16-month period, a new 18-song collection of duets. You might think it would be hard to get motivated to hit the studio at his age, but when you consider the talented group of female vocalists with whom Nelson collaborated on this album, how could he not be excited? The brilliant list of collaborators is a veritable who's »»»
Let's Face the Music and Dance CD review - Let's Face the Music and Dance
Willie Nelson celebrated his 80th birthday in April by releasing this collection of classics. There is 1 Nelson original here, an acoustic version of the relatively obscure track Is the Better Part Over from Nelson's 1989 album "A Horse Called Music," but for the most part, Nelson puts his unique stamp on pop, jazz and country standards. The '50s pop/rock era is represented by an effective rendition of The Platters' hit Twilight Time and a rocking version of Carl »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Gibson Brothers join "Brotherhood" in style – The idea of releasing "Brotherhood" by veteran bluegrass band The Gibson Brothers was a natural. The disc paid tribute to a long list of brother acts including the Everlys and lesser known acts like the York Brothers and the Four Brothers. While the younger Gibson, Leigh, sure gave Eric a ton of grief throughout the show - all in jest, of... »»»
Concert Review: Moorer, Gauthier pull for each other – In their own right, Allison Moorer and Mary Gauthier did not really need the other because each is most capable of headlining. But in one of those geniuses of booking, fans had the chance to see the two in a most enjoyable and alternative setting - a good, old-fashioned guitar pull. That meant that the two were seated in comfortable chairs on... »»»
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Windfall CD review - Windfall
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