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Wilco plays Newport

Tuesday, April 10, 2012 – Wilco will play the Newport Folk Festival on Friday, July 27 at 5 p.m. on the opening gig of the three-day festival.

The festival takes place at Fort Adams State Park. Special guests Blitzen Trapper and Megafaun will play on the Wilco bill. "We are excited to return to the tradition of presenting a Friday concert at the festival, and we are happy to have Wilco, Blitzen Trapper and Megafaun kick off what already promises to be a great weekend of music," said Newport Folk Festival Producer Jay Sweet.

Tickets are $45 and go on sale on Friday, April 13 at 11 a.m. at www.ticketmaster.com. All seating is general admission on an open lawn. Gates open at 4 p.m. Limited edition keepsakes will be given to the first 1,000 people to enter the gates.

More news for Wilco

CD reviews for Wilco

Mermaid Avenue: The Complete Session CD review - Mermaid Avenue: The Complete Session
Originally released in 1998, "Mermaid Avenue" is a stunning collaboration between English folk singer/songwriter Billy Bragg and the American roots rock juggernaut Wilco that found the artists setting unpublished Woody Guthrie lyrics to music. The initial release was so well received that a second disc of songs from the Mermaid Avenue Sessions was released in 2000. Now, in conjunction with celebrations of what would have been Guthrie's 100th birthday, Nonesuch Records has bundled »»»
Being There
Wilco's follow up to "A.M." is the strange, noisy, unchannelled, dissonant, seductive, tuneful, and fiercely joyful result of the burden of expectations. Jeff Tweedy founded Uncle Tupelo, and inadvertently inspired a country insurgency. This double CD is Tweedy's kiss-off. "Misunderstood" opens with primitive feedback, melting into six string and piano. "I want to thank you all for nothing," Tweedy cries over tribal drumming. We know this isn't to be a record of subtleties. »»»
A.M.
After the breakup of pioneering alternative-country band Uncle Tupelo, it looked like the end of the line for the band's large cult following, who found musical nirvana in Uncle Tupelo's blend of indie-rock guts and heartfelt country twang. The legacy continues, however, in Wilco and Son Volt, respectively led by former Tupelo principals Jeff Tweedy and Jay Farrar. "A. M," showcases Tweedy's more pop-leaning sensibilities. The album begins with a couple of rootsy pop-rock gems ("I Must Be High" »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Gibson Brothers join "Brotherhood" in style – The idea of releasing "Brotherhood" by veteran bluegrass band The Gibson Brothers was a natural. The disc paid tribute to a long list of brother acts including the Everlys and lesser known acts like the York Brothers and the Four Brothers. While the younger Gibson, Leigh, sure gave Eric a ton of grief throughout the show - all in jest, of... »»»
Concert Review: Moorer, Gauthier pull for each other – In their own right, Allison Moorer and Mary Gauthier did not really need the other because each is most capable of headlining. But in one of those geniuses of booking, fans had the chance to see the two in a most enjoyable and alternative setting - a good, old-fashioned guitar pull. That meant that the two were seated in comfortable chairs on... »»»
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