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Nail finds the sound in Alabama

Wednesday, March 21, 2012 – With his band in tow, David Nail made his way to the Alabama Theater in Birmingham, Ala. to film the music video for his newest single, The Sound of a Million Dreams.

Working with director Chris Hicky, Nail worked to create the essence of music's ability to capture one's life without reducing the video to a storyline or series of obvious images. "Everyone has that song or songs," said Nail. "That's the most amazing thing about music: the way songs can hold your life. It does for me, and for just about everybody I know... So, I didn't want this video to take anything away from the dreams that other people have in their music."

The team wanted an older theatre, something that suggested the amount of music that had been played there and the number of lives that had passed through the building. They wanted to bring to the forefront the notion of how music marking lives is ongoing. The Alabama Theater, built in 1927, was chosen, in part, because of the strong relationship Nail has had with the Birmingham market since performing unplugged at the Bama Rising Concert, a show put together by the band Alabama featuring The Commodores (sans Lionel Richie), Sheryl Crow, Brad Paisley and the Blind Boys of Alabama.

"The people there are so soulful," he said. "You can feel the music moving through them, and you know it's a part of who they are. We didn't even use extra people in our video, but you can feel their passion for the songs and artists in the air."

With a stark stage and warm light, the music video begins with Nail alone onstage. Slowly, the musicians appear as their instruments rise up in the arrangement. Hicky, the man responsible for the 2010 Academy of Country Music Video of the Year (Miranda Lambert's White Liar), projects footage of Nail from the age of six until now throughout the scene. The slide show displays still photographs of his infancy onwards on various surfaces to cement dreams into music.

Finishing his tour with Gavin DeGraw, Nail now heads out on the road with Billy Currington.

More news for David Nail

CD reviews for David Nail

I'm a Fire CD review - I'm a Fire
The struggles battling severe depression despite budding success and the adoration of peers and fans alike that David Nail endured during his journey to the recent release of his new album reads something like a country song of its own. And in hindsight, Nail's previous releases were brooding and at times melancholy. Unconscious reflections of his previously undiagnosed condition? Maybe. Nonetheless, the unmistakable positive vibe that shines through his newest album doesn't diminish »»»
The Sound Of A Million Dreams CD review - The Sound Of A Million Dreams
David Nail is a rare mainstream country artist who actually stands out from the rest of Music Row's regulars. Instead of leaning towards one of the two dominant styles of Nashville country, pop or rock, Nail blends country with soul and R&B. When he builds upon his strengths, the songs shine. The single misstep, Grandpa's Farm, sounds like a blend of recent Kid Rock and Dusty Springfield's Son of a Preacher Man; which is as awkward as the comparison sounds. »»»
I'm About to Come Alive CD review - I'm About to Come Alive
Newcomer David Nail cites the Beatles, Elton John and Motown as key musical influences. While his long-time-coming debut certainly leans toward pop and soul rather than traditional country, vocally the southeast Missouri native is far more Kenny Chesney with a bit of Marc Cohn and Hal Ketchum than Stevie Wonder. It's an impressive debut for the strikingly handsome Nail, whose country career has had numerous fits and starts since arriving in Nashville a decade ago. Frank Liddell's »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: MerleFest Day 4: fest closes with everything from hymns to honky tonk – For the final day of MerleFest 2015, the programming ran from gospel music in the morning to the barroom honky-tonk of Dwight Yoakam's closing set. That wide range is what makes the festival such a success as it carries on the "traditional plus" design of the late Doc Watson. With the Avett Brothers in town for their Saturday night... »»»
Concert Review: MerleFest Day 3: it's homecoming day – A wet and overcast day did little to dampen the spirits of the artists or the audience at MerleFest on Saturday; typically the busiest day of the four-day long festival. With home-state heroes The Avett Brothers headlining the Watson Stage, it felt like a homecoming celebration all day long. Friday may have been the day for new talent to shine, but... »»»
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