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Nail finds the sound in Alabama

Wednesday, March 21, 2012 – With his band in tow, David Nail made his way to the Alabama Theater in Birmingham, Ala. to film the music video for his newest single, The Sound of a Million Dreams.

Working with director Chris Hicky, Nail worked to create the essence of music's ability to capture one's life without reducing the video to a storyline or series of obvious images. "Everyone has that song or songs," said Nail. "That's the most amazing thing about music: the way songs can hold your life. It does for me, and for just about everybody I know... So, I didn't want this video to take anything away from the dreams that other people have in their music."

The team wanted an older theatre, something that suggested the amount of music that had been played there and the number of lives that had passed through the building. They wanted to bring to the forefront the notion of how music marking lives is ongoing. The Alabama Theater, built in 1927, was chosen, in part, because of the strong relationship Nail has had with the Birmingham market since performing unplugged at the Bama Rising Concert, a show put together by the band Alabama featuring The Commodores (sans Lionel Richie), Sheryl Crow, Brad Paisley and the Blind Boys of Alabama.

"The people there are so soulful," he said. "You can feel the music moving through them, and you know it's a part of who they are. We didn't even use extra people in our video, but you can feel their passion for the songs and artists in the air."

With a stark stage and warm light, the music video begins with Nail alone onstage. Slowly, the musicians appear as their instruments rise up in the arrangement. Hicky, the man responsible for the 2010 Academy of Country Music Video of the Year (Miranda Lambert's White Liar), projects footage of Nail from the age of six until now throughout the scene. The slide show displays still photographs of his infancy onwards on various surfaces to cement dreams into music.

Finishing his tour with Gavin DeGraw, Nail now heads out on the road with Billy Currington.

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CD reviews for David Nail

The Fighter CD review - The Fighter
A singer's believability is essential to the success of any album, and David Nail has a way of persuading us that every word he sings on his "Fighter" comes straight from the heart. And it doesn't hurt that the songwriting contained within is topnotch throughout. Two songs, in particular, go straight to the heart in addition to being heartfelt. "Home," which Lori McKenna both sings on and co-wrote, is the first song on this record that will absolutely stop you in your tracks. »»»
I'm a Fire CD review - I'm a Fire
The struggles battling severe depression despite budding success and the adoration of peers and fans alike that David Nail endured during his journey to the recent release of his new album reads something like a country song of its own. And in hindsight, Nail's previous releases were brooding and at times melancholy. Unconscious reflections of his previously undiagnosed condition? Maybe. Nonetheless, the unmistakable positive vibe that shines through his newest album doesn't diminish »»»
The Sound Of A Million Dreams CD review - The Sound Of A Million Dreams
David Nail is a rare mainstream country artist who actually stands out from the rest of Music Row's regulars. Instead of leaning towards one of the two dominant styles of Nashville country, pop or rock, Nail blends country with soul and R&B. When he builds upon his strengths, the songs shine. The single misstep, Grandpa's Farm, sounds like a blend of recent Kid Rock and Dusty Springfield's Son of a Preacher Man; which is as awkward as the comparison sounds. »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Lots to like about McKenna (when you could hear her) – Lori McKenna had lots of reasons to be in a good mood. First off, the opening band, a pop act called teenender included two of her sons. In two days, her 11th disc, "The Tree" would be released to glowing reviews. So it would seem that this homecoming show was the ideal setting with all five kids, her husband, siblings, cousins, people who... »»»
Concert Review: With Sugarland, the wait was worth it – A few songs into Sugarland's show, Kristian Bush referenced the band's five-year gap between tours saying, "A lot of people think Jennifer and I have been on a five-year vacation. Actually, we've been very busy." Clearly a lot of that time was spent in rehearsal. The duo put on a two-hour high energy gem that started out big... »»»
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