Sign up for newsletter
 

Nail finds the sound in Alabama

Wednesday, March 21, 2012 – With his band in tow, David Nail made his way to the Alabama Theater in Birmingham, Ala. to film the music video for his newest single, The Sound of a Million Dreams.

Working with director Chris Hicky, Nail worked to create the essence of music's ability to capture one's life without reducing the video to a storyline or series of obvious images. "Everyone has that song or songs," said Nail. "That's the most amazing thing about music: the way songs can hold your life. It does for me, and for just about everybody I know... So, I didn't want this video to take anything away from the dreams that other people have in their music."

The team wanted an older theatre, something that suggested the amount of music that had been played there and the number of lives that had passed through the building. They wanted to bring to the forefront the notion of how music marking lives is ongoing. The Alabama Theater, built in 1927, was chosen, in part, because of the strong relationship Nail has had with the Birmingham market since performing unplugged at the Bama Rising Concert, a show put together by the band Alabama featuring The Commodores (sans Lionel Richie), Sheryl Crow, Brad Paisley and the Blind Boys of Alabama.

"The people there are so soulful," he said. "You can feel the music moving through them, and you know it's a part of who they are. We didn't even use extra people in our video, but you can feel their passion for the songs and artists in the air."

With a stark stage and warm light, the music video begins with Nail alone onstage. Slowly, the musicians appear as their instruments rise up in the arrangement. Hicky, the man responsible for the 2010 Academy of Country Music Video of the Year (Miranda Lambert's White Liar), projects footage of Nail from the age of six until now throughout the scene. The slide show displays still photographs of his infancy onwards on various surfaces to cement dreams into music.

Finishing his tour with Gavin DeGraw, Nail now heads out on the road with Billy Currington.

More news for David Nail

CD reviews for David Nail

I'm a Fire CD review - I'm a Fire
The struggles battling severe depression despite budding success and the adoration of peers and fans alike that David Nail endured during his journey to the recent release of his new album reads something like a country song of its own. And in hindsight, Nail's previous releases were brooding and at times melancholy. Unconscious reflections of his previously undiagnosed condition? Maybe. Nonetheless, the unmistakable positive vibe that shines through his newest album doesn't diminish »»»
The Sound Of A Million Dreams CD review - The Sound Of A Million Dreams
David Nail is a rare mainstream country artist who actually stands out from the rest of Music Row's regulars. Instead of leaning towards one of the two dominant styles of Nashville country, pop or rock, Nail blends country with soul and R&B. When he builds upon his strengths, the songs shine. The single misstep, Grandpa's Farm, sounds like a blend of recent Kid Rock and Dusty Springfield's Son of a Preacher Man; which is as awkward as the comparison sounds. »»»
I'm About to Come Alive CD review - I'm About to Come Alive
Newcomer David Nail cites the Beatles, Elton John and Motown as key musical influences. While his long-time-coming debut certainly leans toward pop and soul rather than traditional country, vocally the southeast Missouri native is far more Kenny Chesney with a bit of Marc Cohn and Hal Ketchum than Stevie Wonder. It's an impressive debut for the strikingly handsome Nail, whose country career has had numerous fits and starts since arriving in Nashville a decade ago. Frank Liddell's »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Making perfect sense of Striking Matches, The Secret Sisters – The pairing of Striking Matches and The Secret Sisters on tour makes perfect sense. Both are duos, although the Matches are male/female and the Secrets truly are sisters (Rogers is the name, not Secret). Both emphasize keen vocal interplay. And perhaps most importantly, they shared a very famous producer, T Bone Burnett. But when it came to the live... »»»
Concert Review: Whitehorse changes gears – Whitehorse, the Canadian husband-and-wife duo of Melissa McClelland and Luke Doucet, has changed gears. In years past, they were more on the roots side, but you would have scratched your head wondering where that went during their show at what is billed as a folk club. Only Whitehorse couldn't be accused of being folk oriented either in a tour... »»»
Subscribe to Country News Digest Country News Digest      Follow Country Standard Time on twitter CST      Visit Country Standard Time on Facebook CST

Elsewhere in the news

Currently at the CST blogs

Moorer gets "Down to Believing" Allison Moorer packed a lot of living in the past five years leading up to the recently released "Down To Believing." The results are evident throughout the effort, like a light at the end of a tunnel. Writing or co-writing 12 of the 13 tracks, Moorer is fearlessly open and autobiographical. "Even when I try to make them about something or someone else, they always end up being about me. I am the subject that I know best." ... »»»
Thanks to Wills, AATW remains the king After over 40 years of touring and recording as the founder, lead guitar and front-man for Western Swing music's standard-bearers, Asleep At The Wheel, Ray Benson has a lot of irons in the fire these days. In fact, with his TV show Texas Music Scene a hit throughout the southwestern U.S. and touring in support of AATW's new release, "Still the King: Celebrating the Music of Bob Wills and His Texas Playboys," he is as busy now as ever.... »»»
Pug turns writer's block into "Windfall" In his life and career, Joe Pug has never done anything halfway. So when Pug experienced a crippling lack of creative inspiration after his punishing road schedule to promote 2012's "The Great Despiser," he didn't consider the possibility of taking a short break. Joe Pug was on the verge of throwing in the towel.... »»»
Sundown Over Ghost Town CD review - Sundown Over Ghost Town
It's not an overstatement to say that Eilen Jewell is Johnny Cash reincarnate - at least, that's the sound she puts forth on her seventh album, "Sundown Over Ghost Town." Jewell's melancholy vocals and simplistic instrumentation betray just enough to show each song's depth and autobiographical roots. »»»
Bayou Boys CD review - Bayou Boys
Unlike some country music stars have when they reached a certain age, John Anderson chooses to not rest on his laurels. Instead the 60-year-old member of the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame continues to release new recordings - although not as frequently as in his chart-topping heyday of 1980-1995 - featuring largely original numbers. »»»
Monterey CD review - Monterey
The Milk Carton Kids may be one of the most unlikely Americana contenders of the past few years. Relying solely on dual acoustic guitars and close-knit harmonies, they look and sound like an introspective folk duo circa the mid '60s - think Simon and Garfunkel, Peter and Gordon, or Chad and Jeremy »»»
The Malpass Brothers CD review - The Malpass Brothers
The North Carolina-based Malpass Brothers' passion for the classic country of past decades is nicely displayed on their latest self-titled release. Christopher and Taylor Malpass are most effective when they tackle brotherly harmonies as with covers of the Wilburn Brothers' "Which One Is To Blame" and the Louvin Brothers' "Satan and the Saint," »»»
Banditos CD review - Banditos
It takes a certain raw instinct to make music that's as unhinged and unruly as that purveyed by Banditos. Originally from Alabama and now ensconced in Nashville, this scruffy looking bunch of 20-somethings makes a sound that's wholly raw, raucous and unrefined, a perfect anecdote to the polite, plaintive melodies that defines much of what's typecast as Americana these days. »»»