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Cash birthday tribute concert draws Chesney, Kristofferson, Johnson

Tuesday, February 28, 2012 – Johnny Cash would have turned 80 this year, and artists ranging from Kenny Chesney to Jamey Johnson to Kristofferson to Chris Cornell will join for "We Walk The Line: A Celebration of the Music of Johnny Cash," an April 26 concert in Austin.

The concert will be at Austin City Limits Live at The Moody Theatre. Other performers are Carolina Chocolate Drops, Ronnie Dunn, Ray LaMontagne, Amy Lee and Lucinda Williams, as well as performances by Brandi Carlile, Andy Grammer, John Hiatt, Shooter Jennings and Rhett Miller with more performers to be announced shortly. Tickets go on-sale to the general public on Wednesday, Feb. 29.

"Our family is honored to know that this amazing line-up of artists will gather together on one stage to pay tribute to the music and history of my father," said John Carter Cash. "There is no doubt in my mind that, although he is no longer with us in body, his spirit will shine true on this night thanks to these inspired artists."

"Having been a fan of Johnny Cash and his music for as long as I can remember I could not be more excited to produce an event that honors such a musical legend," said event producer Keith Wortman. "His iconic voice, style and authenticity has inspired musicians for generations and we are proud to be able to celebrate his artistic legacy with some of today's greatest entertainers while also benefitting such an amazing children's cause Charley's Fund."

An all-star band led by Don Was includes Buddy Miller, Kenny Aronoff, Ian McLagen, and Greg Leisz. Was, who worked with Cash on an album for The Highwaymen, will serve as musical director.

Charley's Fund helps find a cure for the fatal children's disease Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

"We Walk The Line: A Celebration of the Music of Johnny Cash" will be produced and distributed in conjunction with Legacy Recordings, the division of Sony Music Entertainment that serves as the home of Johnny Cash's music catalog.

Cash's 80th Birthday celebration kicks off on Feb. 26, the day which would have been his 80th birthday, with the ground-breaking of the Johnny Cash Boyhood Home Project in Dyess, Ark. The house that Cash grew up in will become a permanent tribute to him and his family's early life, as well as reflecting a historical slice of American life during the 1930s Great Depression. In addition, Legacy Recordings is set to celebrate this landmark year with a full slate of projects to be released throughout the next 12 months. First up is "Bootleg Vol. IV: The Soul of Truth," a 2-CD, 51-track collection which comprises gospel and spiritual recordings made by Cash in the 1970s and '80s, to be released on April 3.

More news for Johnny Cash

CD reviews for Johnny Cash

Out Among the Stars CD review - Out Among the Stars
One would think that with all the archival music, reissues and postmortem tributes released on Johnny Cash's behalf, the vaults would have been scraped pretty clean by now, with only scraps left for dedicated completists to feast upon. So it comes as no small surprise to find that the Cash archivists actually uncovered some entire sessions that haven't been unearthed until now. Recorded in the early '80s, "Out Among The Stars" is such a high quality collection that it »»»
Bootleg Vol. IV: The Soul of Truth CD review - Bootleg Vol. IV: The Soul of Truth
For the most recent addition to the Johnny Cash Bootleg Series, Columbia Records/Legacy Recordings dipped into the deep well of Cash's gospel and spiritual recordings for Columbia and smaller boutique labels throughout the 1970s and '80s. This set is unique from its predecessors thanks in large part to the three full-length studio albums contained within. The 2-disc, 51-track collection, released in conjunction with ongoing celebrations of Cash's 80th birthday, gets off to a »»»
From Memphis To Hollywood CD review - From Memphis To Hollywood
Legacy Recordings' latest release of archival Johnny Cash material is a bit of a mixed bag. Although the set is packed with goodies from the start of Cash's career, the 57 tracks on this 2-disc set cover a lot of musical territory with recordings ranging from radio appearances and early demos to non-album singles, B-sides and other rarities, resulting in a collection that ultimately lacks cohesion. If you can remove the idea of a fully-realized album from your head and view the set as a »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: For Doug Seegers, no pinching needed – Doug Seegers probably should be pinching himself these days. He's not some country music cover boy or hunk wearing a baseball hat or highlighting a bunch of tattoos. If looking for opposites of what passes for a country musician these days, Seegers would probably just about be the top pick. Yes, he lives in Nashville, but he just retired after... »»»
Concert Review: Cynics be damned, Carter girl endures – Cynical naysayers without a clue would aim their vitriol at Carlene Carter. Yes, she is one of the progeny of the Carter family, the first family of country music. And she is quite proud of it. So much so that after watching Maybelle Carter perform with her sisters and being the daughter of June Carter Cash (not to mention Johnny Cash's... »»»
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