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Nelson goes home

Wednesday, February 1, 2012 – Willie Nelson is going home. Sony Legacy announced today that Nelson is rejoining the label for at least five new albums starting this spring and the release of archival material.

From 1975-1993, Nelson cut top-selling singles and albums for Columbia Records, beginning with 1975's smash "Red Headed Stranger."

Forthcoming Nelson titles under the Legacy imprint will include newly recorded songs and performances as well as archival releases, personally curated by Nelson, drawn from all phases of his career including his recordings for RCA Records and others.

Nelson will work with label archivists to select recordings, including previously released and previously unreleased tracks, for release in newly compiled collections and as bonus material on new editions of existing titles. The newly curated Nelson titles "will provide fresh perspective and context to the artist's profoundly influential and successful career," according to a press release.

"I'm really happy to be back home with Sony Music. We have been partners for many years; all the way back to Pamper Music and Tree Music. We share a great history, and I'm looking forward to many more years together," said Nelson.

"We couldn't be more excited to have the opportunity to work with Willie on this landmark partnership," said Adam Block, Executive Vice President and General Manager, Legacy Recordings. "There's a natural and organic relationship between new recording projects and catalog activity that promises to ensure the lasting importance of Willie and his music."

More news for Willie Nelson

CD reviews for Willie Nelson

Summertime Willie Nelson Sings Gershwin CD review - Summertime Willie Nelson Sings Gershwin
Willie Nelson is arguably the greatest living interpreter of American standards. His 1978 album "Stardust," which may very well be his greatest studio recording, came out of nowhere and wowed fans and critics alike with its unique and respectful take on classic American tunes. Nelson proved the formula still worked with the 2009 album "American Classic," and his live performances for decades have been peppered with songs from the great American songbook. »»»
Band of Brothers CD review - Band of Brothers
Willie Nelson has been routinely busy since 1996 with touring, recording, writing books and more touring. Yet his latest offering is a rarity of sorts in that it's his first true studio album of primarily new material since 1996. And like so much of his material beforehand, Nelson mines very little new ground with this record. That doesn't mean it's not stellar however! The first song "Bring It On" contains all the hallmarks of a classic Nelson tune, from the »»»
To All the Girls... CD review - To All the Girls...
At 80, it would be easy for Willie Nelson to take a step back and rest on his laurels a bit. Instead, the country legend just released his third studio album in only a 16-month period, a new 18-song collection of duets. You might think it would be hard to get motivated to hit the studio at his age, but when you consider the talented group of female vocalists with whom Nelson collaborated on this album, how could he not be excited? The brilliant list of collaborators is a veritable who's »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: The Cadillac Three, Sellers do it their own way – The way The Cadillac Three lead singer Jaren Johnston told it, the band could have had their choice of opening tours this year for the likes of Kenny Chesney, Dierks Bentley and Jake Owen. No go though because the long-haired singer fronting the rough-and-most-definitely ready trio said the band wanted to do it their own way. Based on this most... »»»
Concert Review: Great songs, not glitz, highlight Lynn tribute – An eclectic group of Americana artists gathered together for a relatively low-key tribute to Loretta Lynn on the eve of the glitzy Grammy Awards. In contrast to the expensive dresses and song sets displayed at Staples Center for the awards show TV broadcast, these performers were backed by a skillful traditional country music house band.... »»»
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