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Nelson goes home

Wednesday, February 1, 2012 – Willie Nelson is going home. Sony Legacy announced today that Nelson is rejoining the label for at least five new albums starting this spring and the release of archival material.

From 1975-1993, Nelson cut top-selling singles and albums for Columbia Records, beginning with 1975's smash "Red Headed Stranger."

Forthcoming Nelson titles under the Legacy imprint will include newly recorded songs and performances as well as archival releases, personally curated by Nelson, drawn from all phases of his career including his recordings for RCA Records and others.

Nelson will work with label archivists to select recordings, including previously released and previously unreleased tracks, for release in newly compiled collections and as bonus material on new editions of existing titles. The newly curated Nelson titles "will provide fresh perspective and context to the artist's profoundly influential and successful career," according to a press release.

"I'm really happy to be back home with Sony Music. We have been partners for many years; all the way back to Pamper Music and Tree Music. We share a great history, and I'm looking forward to many more years together," said Nelson.

"We couldn't be more excited to have the opportunity to work with Willie on this landmark partnership," said Adam Block, Executive Vice President and General Manager, Legacy Recordings. "There's a natural and organic relationship between new recording projects and catalog activity that promises to ensure the lasting importance of Willie and his music."

More news for Willie Nelson

CD reviews for Willie Nelson

To All the Girls... CD review - To All the Girls...
At 80, it would be easy for Willie Nelson to take a step back and rest on his laurels a bit. Instead, the country legend just released his third studio album in only a 16-month period, a new 18-song collection of duets. You might think it would be hard to get motivated to hit the studio at his age, but when you consider the talented group of female vocalists with whom Nelson collaborated on this album, how could he not be excited? The brilliant list of collaborators is a veritable who's »»»
Let's Face the Music and Dance CD review - Let's Face the Music and Dance
Willie Nelson celebrated his 80th birthday in April by releasing this collection of classics. There is 1 Nelson original here, an acoustic version of the relatively obscure track Is the Better Part Over from Nelson's 1989 album "A Horse Called Music," but for the most part, Nelson puts his unique stamp on pop, jazz and country standards. The '50s pop/rock era is represented by an effective rendition of The Platters' hit Twilight Time and a rocking version of Carl »»»
Freedom CD review - Freedom
Willie Nelson's new disc is an interesting mixture of songs and contains some most unlikely collaborations. Did you ever envision Kris Kristofferson and Snoop Dogg doing a duet or Willie doing a song by either Coldplay or Pearl Jam? Give Nelson credit for being able to recognize a good song or an unlikely partner and have it work out. The unlikely pair of Kristofferson and Dogg team up on Willie's so poetic Roll Me Up And Smoke Me When I Die . Listen to the brilliant interpretation of »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: 19 years later, Harris returns with "Wrecking Ball" – At one point, Emmylou Harris told the crowd that she could not believe it had been 19 years since she released "Wrecking Ball." That was most understandable because based on this concert tour devoted towards playing the left of center atmospheric disc, the song bird has hardly missed a beat. Harris' label, Nonesuch, just released a... »»»
Concert Review: Hurray for the Riff: more than just a great name – Hurray for the Riff Raff is one well-named group. Not that it signifies all that much musically, but at least it's catchy and makes you want to root for the underdog. With a lot to live up moniker wise, the band in concert - which, in reality, is lead singer Alynda Lee Segarra from New Orleans and her backing mates - more than lived up to the "pressure.... »»»
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