Sign up for newsletter
 

Women face charges in Sugarland concert tragedy

Monday, November 28, 2011 – Two Indianapolis women allegedly filed false injury claims with the state to obtain money set aside in the wake of the Indiana State Fair tragedy at a Sugarland concert, according to the Indianapolis Star.

Investigators say neither women was at the fair on Aug. 13 when a sudden wind kicked up, toppling the staging before Sugarland hit the stage. Seven people were killed in the incident.

Stephanie Murry, 25, and Sandra Hurn, 38, face fraud charges. Marion County Prosecutor Terry Curry said Tuesday the pair were charged with making false claims in order to collect money from two funds set aside for victims of the tragedy from the Indiana State Fair Remembrance Fund and the Indiana Tort Claim Fund, Curry said.

"I do not understand the mentality of someone who would look at the circumstances of that night and see the potential for financial profit from this kind of scheme," Curry said in the Star article. "Most of us would look at those circumstances and feel sympathy and a desire to help assist the real victims in any way we could."

"It is particularly troubling that individuals would attempt to illegally profit upon a tragedy such as the State Fair stage collapse," Curry said. "We have zero tolerance for those who wish to gain at the misfortune of others."

Investigators started examining their claims after an Indiana State Fair Commission official, Justin Armstrong, reported to Indiana State Police that his office had received two claim claims from women seeking funds that appeared "questionable." The women submitted claims totaling $22,500.

One problem was that Hurn allegedly said Sugarland performed "a couple of songs" before the collapse. Sugarland never set foot on stage.

Hurn allegedly went to a hospital shortly after midnight Aug. 14 and later that afternoon to create a trail supporting her claims. Hurn eventually confessed to the scheme, the story said.

Hurn faces felony charges of forgery, perjury, theft and attempted theft. Murry faces felony charges of forgery, perjury and attempted theft. Hurn could receive 36 years in prison if convicted plus thousands of dollars in fines. Murry faces a maximum of 14 years in prison, if convicted, in addition to any financial penalties.

More news for Sugarland

CD reviews for Sugarland

The Incredible Machine CD review - The Incredible Machine
"The Incredible Machine" is a rather unfortunate title for Sugarland's latest full-length. Listening to Find The Beat Again, for example, makes it sound as though vocalist Jennifer Nettles wants to be Deborah Harry-fronting-Katrina & the Waves rather than, say, a latter-day Loretta Lynn. With its handclap rhythm and shouted "Hey, Hey" on the chorus, this track - along with many others - finds Sugarland firmly entrenched in a predictable pop music device. »»»
Gold and Green CD review - Gold and Green
Jennifer Nettles has one of the most distinctive voices in today's country music, which makes every thing she sings oh so easy on the ears. And with this 10-song holiday CD, Nettles never fails to please, vocally. So when one of these recordings is little more than Nettles singing, and sparse banjos backing (along with Kristian Bush's complimentary vocal), as happens with O Come, O Come, Emmanuel, it's a thing of simple musical beauty. Bush also takes a few lead vocals, but Nettles »»»
Live on the Inside CD review - Live on the Inside
Often it isn't the material chosen or the sound quality that makes a live album good or poor, but the act being captured. To that end Sugarland isn't a good band at all to capture on an audio CD. The group's live shows are renowned, and anyone who has been to one and wants a reminder of that experience will love CD/DVD. Yet those who just want to hear good music performed by Sugarland will be disappointed. On nearly every song, Jennifer Nettles asks for audience participation and readily gets it. »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Washburn, Fleck give reasons to be happy  – "I sing because I'm happy," sang Abigail Washburn toward the end of her show with fellow banjo picker (not to mention, husband) Bela Fleck in the closing number of the night "His Eye is on the Sparrow." Washburn had a lot of reason to be on this night in a beautiful setting at Harvard University. The two held court over two... »»»
Concert Review: For The Jayhawks, no reissues needed – The Jayhawks have not released any new music since 2011's "Mockingbird Time," but, well actually, there are reasons for one of the key contributors to the alt.-country music. In July, "Sounds of Lies" (1997), "Smile" (2000) and "Rainy Day Music" (2003) saw the light of day again in expanded reissue versions.... »»»
Subscribe to Country News Digest Country News Digest      Follow Country Standard Time on twitter CST      Visit Country Standard Time on Facebook CST

Elsewhere in the news

Currently at the CST blogs

Book dishes on guys writing the songs Jake Brown can't stop writing about music. Over the past 10 years, he's published 35 books, ranging from "Rick Rubin: In the Studio" and "Suge Knight: The Rise, Fall and Rise of Death Row Records" to "Heart: In the Studio." In 2012, he won the Association for Recorded Sound Collections Awards in the category of Excellence in Historical Recorded Sound Research.... »»»
Finally, Skaggs and White duet Perhaps there are few more beloved names in the world of country and bluegrass music than Ricky Skaggs and his wife Sharon of the country music family act The Whites. The two have been close friends since their teenage years through music, first meeting at a festival where White was performing with her father Buck White and sister Cheryl, and Skaggs was playing with Keith Whitley.... »»»
Douglas dreams on Taking a second look at the two-album deal he had recently signed with the Rounder/Concord group, and then at his busy upcoming touring schedule, Jerry Douglas suddenly realized he didn't have a lot of time to waste. The first album, "Three Bells," a collaboration with fellow resophonic guitar (aka "Dobro") titans Rob Ickes of Blue Highway and the late Mike Auldridge was pretty much ready to go, the sessions having been completed shortly before Auldridge's passing in December 2012 following a lengthy struggle with cancer.... »»»
Rock & Roll Time CD review - Rock & Roll Time
One of the seminal figures in the development - some would say, the assault - of early rock 'n' roll, Jerry Lewis always possessed pure country credence as well. His initial outings mined the full spectrum of his rural Louisiana roots, bringing them to bear in a daring, often outrageous display of unrepentant madness and machismo that rivalled Little Richard and even Elvis himself in terms of sheer bravado. »»»
Anything Goes CD review - Anything Goes
The title of Florida Georgia's second full length is accurate. For the duo of Tyler Hubbard and Brian Kelly, that means girls, girls and more girls plus an ultra dose of partying. That is evident from the refrain of the title track, which, of course, focuses on Friday night activities. "I brought the songs and you brought the party/Only one way to do it up right..."  »»»
Old Boots, New Dirt CD review - Old Boots, New Dirt
Arguing whether or not Jason Aldean's kinda (country) party is, in fact, anything remotely related to true country music is pointless. Aldean is so entrenched in the mainstream country marketplace now, we just need to accept him as he is, the same way we reluctantly accept Taylor Swift as "country." It's mighty tempting to subtitle a review of Aldean's new "Old Boots, New Dirt" release as 'Pickup Trucks & Pickup Lines," »»»
Going Down to the River CD review - Going Down to the River
You have to feel a pang of pride when you hear the story of Doug Seegers. In fact, it's not a stretch to say you could have seen him live and didn't even know it. At 62, he's a guy who basically opened his guitar case and played the street corners of Nashville, New York, Austin and probably most every city he's traveled through. Seegers also is now the darling of Sweden's country music crowd... »»»
I'm the Troubadour CD review - I'm the Troubadour
Hal Ketchum has rarely ventured out of traditional country realms, and for good reason. With 10 previous albums to his credit, a career that stretches back nearly 30 years, and no less than 17 singles on the country charts - and a half dozen of those reaching well into the Top Ten -- his country credentials are exceedingly well established. »»»