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Drive-By Truckers' Shonna Tucker exits

Monday, December 5, 2011 – Drive-By Truckers bassist Shonna Tucker announced today she is leaving the band, although she gave no reason for her departure. She also did not indicate any future plans.

Tucker has been on tour with DBT promoting their new disc, "Go Go Boots." She started playing with the band in 2004 on "The Dirty South" CD. She had been married to Jason Isbell, who had been guitarist in the band before leaving for a solo career.

In a statement on the band' web site, Tucker said, "Unfortunately, I come to you all with some sad news. It's time for me to move on to the next great thing, whatever that may be."

"I want to thank each and everyone of you, with my whole heart for your overwhelming kindness and support over the years. You are the greatest fans in the world! You really do amaze and inspire me. I can't express how much you all mean to me. Your rock solid encouragement has carried me through, many nights. I have been so lucky to have had the chance to meet and talk with so many of you. Your stories and passion are so incredibly inspirational to me."

"I am, without a doubt, not done. I will have a website up and running very soon so that we can keep in touch. I have a whole lot left to say and do, and I can't wait to hear what all of you are up to. This is very difficult, so I'll leave you with this... for now...Thank you all so much!"

"Safe travels and Happy Holidays to you all! See you soon somewhere..."

The band's next date is Dec. 29 in Washington, D.C.

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English Oceans CD review - English Oceans
It would be easy perhaps even tempting - to label Alabama's Drive By Truckers as simply a rowdy and rambunctious country rock outfit that goes all out to make their insurgent sound heard. Not surprisingly, it was their landmark opus, "Southern Rock Opera," an album detailing the exploits of a fictional '70s Dixie-bred outfit called "Betamax Guillotine," that helped solidify both their sound and reputation. They've more or less continued to reinforce that stoic »»»
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Concert Review: Hard Working Americans more than live up to moniker – Hard Working Americans is a generic enough sounding term, conveying that you're part of the lunch bucket crowd. Part of a faceless pack instead of an individual. In reality, it's something of a misnomer for the sextet of the same name heretofore considered a side project. That's because they or in most cases, their other... »»»
Concert Review: Wolf rolls on with ease – Peter Wolf starts off his first disc in six years, "A Cure for Loneliness," with "Rolling On." Great title for a song, and as he would prove in concert, he lived up to those words. The song starts "You can lay down and die / You can lay up and count the tears you've cried / But baby, that's not me / There's a... »»»
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