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Paisley wins ASCAP award

Sunday, November 6, 2011 – Brad Paisley won the ASCAP Songwriter/Artist of the Year Saturday from the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers at its 49th annual country music awards on Sunday in Nashville, while The House That Built Me was the Country Song of the Year.

The writers of country music's most performed songs of the period between April 2010 and March 2011 were honored. Special tribute was paid to Don Williams, who was honored with the ASCAP Golden Note Award, as well as the Civil Wars, who received the ASCAP Vanguard Award.

The evening's top honors were awarded to:

ASCAP Songwriter of the Year: Ben Hayslip

ASCAP Country Song of the Year: "The House That Built Me," written by Allen Shamblin; published by Built On Rock

ASCAP Publisher of the Year: Sea Gayle Music

A total of 36 song honors were handed out while interspersed with very special performances by the writers of the year's Top 5 most performed songs. Those performances included All Over Me, by Ben Hayslip and Josh Turner; Gimmie That Girl, by Ben Hayslip, Rhett Akins and Dallas Davidson (recorded by Joe Nichols); The House That Built Me, by Shamblin (recorded by Miranda Lambert); The Man I Want To Be, performed by Brett James, Tim Nichols and Chris Young; and Roll With It, by Tony Lane and Johnny Park (recorded by Easton Corbin). The show kicked off with reigning ASCAP Country Songwriter/Artist of the Year, Dierks Bentley, performing his current single, Home.

A musical tribute to Don Williams included performances by Keith Urban, who, joined by Little Big Town, honored Williams with his rendition of We've Got a Good Fire Goin', Lee Ann Womack, performing Lord, I Hope This Day Is Good, as well as the honoree himself, who delighted the audience with a surprise performance.

ASCAP President and Chairman Paul Williams and ASCAP Writer Board Member Wayland Holyfield presented Williams with ASCAP's Golden Note Award, which honors Williams for his "universal lyrics, heartfelt melodies and human touch [which] have earned him an extraordinary place in American popular music." The award is presented to songwriters, composers and artists who have achieved extraordinary career milestones. Past recipients include Garth Brooks, Lindsey Buckingham, Alan Jackson, Quincy Jones, Reba McEntire, JD Souther, Stevie Wonder, André Previn and Tom Petty.

Hayslip received his first ASCAP Country Songwriter of the Year award. Hayslip was responsible for penning five of the most performed songs of the past year: All About Tonight (Blake Shelton), All Over Me (Josh Turner), Farmer's Daughter (Rodney Atkins), Gimmie That Girl (Joe Nichols) and The Shape I'm In (Joe Nichols).

Paisley won his second ASCAP Country Songwriter/Artist of the Year award. He first won the award in 2004. No stranger to ASCAP Most Performed Song awards-he had already won 24 prior to this evening-Paisley adds three more this year with Anything Like Me, This Is Country Music and Water.

For the second consecutive year the ASCAP Country Publisher of the Year honors went to Sea Gayle Music who had six award-winning songs: Anything Like Me, Come Back Song, This, This Ain't Nothing, This Is Country Music and Water. Sea Gayle Music's Chris DuBois, Frank Rogers and Paisley won the award.

The Civil Wars-comprised of Joy Williams and John Paul White won the ASCAP Vanguard Award, which recognizes the impact of musical genres that help shape the future of American music. Past ASCAP Vanguard Award honorees include Sara Bareilles, Beastie Boys, Beck, Nine Inch Nails, Arcade Fire, The Killers, Jack Johnson and Bjork.

The ASCAP Global Impact Award - a special award for a song that has had significant impact on multiple formats during the year - honored Josh Kear, Big Yellow Dog Publishing and Darth Buddha for Need You Now (Lady Antebellum).

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Hits Alive CD review - Hits Alive
Brad Paisley's new live hits CD is a bit of a tease. That's because it only goes half way in replicating the true live Paisley experience. Watching the accompanying concert videos at a Paisley show, whether the venue screen is showing Andy Griffith during Waitin' on a Woman or the montage of recently-deceased celebrities that accompanies When I Get Where I'm Going, reveal how Paisley simply must be seen to be fully enjoyed. Nevertheless, Paisley in concert and captured on »»»
American Saturday Night CD review - American Saturday Night
Brad Paisley has grown up on his eighth album. Yes, the West Virginian maintains a sense of humor, but apparently aging has left its mark on a maturing singer who has never forsaken his country roots. That is ever so apparent in songs like Anything Like Me and Oh Yeah, You're Gone. The former finds Paisley looking at the passage of time through his son's life in a tender, but not sappy look. On the latter, he's a five-year-old boy who doesn't get what he wants, which his grandfather notices. »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Not playing the hit proves no problem for Bingham – Ryan Bingham may always end up being best known for collaborating with T Bone Burnett on the soundtrack for the 2009 film starring Jeff Bridges, particularly "The Weary Kind." That would not be a surprise given that he won a Grammy and Oscar for the song. One would, therefore, think that "The Weary Kind" would be one of those... »»»
Concert Review: Abbott brings the joy - even with "Front Row Seat" – To say that the Josh Abbott Band's "Front Row Seat" is an easy listen, especially in concert, would be a tremendous understatement. The Texas country singer released a five-act recording about the development, joy and ultimate dissolution of his marriage last fall. Not exactly easy subject matter, but Abbott managed to bring more than a... »»»
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