Sign up for newsletter
 

Plant, Miller take AMA honors

Friday, October 14, 2011 – Robert Plant's "Band of Joy" won album of the year honors, and Buddy Miller earned an Artist of the Year nod during the Americana Music Association's 10th Annual Honors and Awards Thursday in Nashville.

Miller also won Instrumentalist of the Year Award, his 12th AMA honor.

The 2009 New/Emerging Artist Justin Townes Earle cemented his place as one of Americana Music's heirs apparent by picking up Song of the Year for Harlem River Blues.

The Avett Brothers scored another Duo/Group of the Year win, their third after winning in 2007 and 2010 and fourth overall, while Mumford and Sons were crowned New/Emerging Artist of the Year.

Lucinda Williams accepted the Lifetime Achievement Award for songwriting from record executive Luke Lewis, who last year earned the Lifetime Achievement Award for Executive. She followed it with her reading of Blessed.

Joining Williams in the Lifetime Achievement categories, Gregg Allman received the Lifetime Achievement Award in Performance.

Dobro king Jerry Douglas was honored with the Lifetime Achievement Award for Instrumentalist.

The Jack Emerson Lifetime Achievement for Executive went to Rick Hall, whose production work at FAME Studios created the Muscle Shoals sound, a unique style that crossed musical formats.

Bob Harris came from England to accept his Trailblazer Award for his work in promoting music.

The annual Americana Award Show was peppered with performances, from Amos Lee (Cup of Sorrow), Elizabeth Cook (El Camino), Earle (Harlem River Blues), Jessica Lea Mayfield (For Today), Hayes Carll (KMAG YOYO), The Secret Sisters (Why Don't You Love Me?), Miller (Gasoline and Matches), The Civil Wars (Barton Hollow), The Avett Brothers (The Once and Future Carpenter) and Plant (Monkey).

The event opened with a tribute to the late John Hartford, represented by an unaccompanied banjo and bolo hat side stage, followed by Buddy Miller, Emmylou Harris, Alison Krauss, Jerry Douglas and Don Was performing I'll Fly Away in celebration of the 10th Anniversary of the "O' Brother Where Art Thou?" soundtrack. The evening ended as sentimentally as it began, with Allman performing Sweet Melissa and then, joined by a majority of the night's guests, a rendition of Glory, Glory Hallelujah to a standing audience.

Jim Lauderdale served again as master of ceremonies, his ninth in-a-row, while Miller led an all-star house band comprised of famed record producer Don Was on bass, Cody and Luther Dickinson on drums, guitars and various other instruments, Greg Leisz on steel guitar and John Deaderick on keys. Adding harmonies were The McCrary Sisters: Ann, Regina and Alfreda.

More news for Americana Music Association

Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Despite small crowd, Hood accomplishes mission – It would have been quite easy to think that Adam Hood would have mailed in this gig. It could not have been easy to make your debut in the Boston area after putting out seven albums, not to mention having songs picked by A list artists, and having maybe 25 people show up. If the Alabama native was dissuaded by the small crowd, he did not show it.... »»»
Concert Review: Pistol Annies hit the targets – Pistol Annies, the all-star trio comprised of Miranda Lambert, Ashley Monroe and Angaleena Presley, made the last stop of its short tour a downtown Los Angeles date. This was the last show, that is, until after the pregnant Presley gives birth to her child. Traveling in support of the act's third album "Interstate Gospel," these talented... »»»
Follow Country Standard Time  Subscribe to Country News Digest  Follow Country Standard Time on twitter  Visit Country Standard Time on Facebook 

Elsewhere in the news

Currently at the CST blogs

Taylor uncovers the past, offering new perspectives Suffice it to say that the past has always loomed large throughout Chip Taylor's career. That's all the more obvious if only for the fact that Taylor wrote some of the biggest pop hits of the '60s, "Wild Thing"... »»»
Tyminski goes dark Dan Tyminski (known simply as "Tyminski" on his 2017 release "Southern Gothic") has traditional music roots and unassailable bluegrass street cred especially given his membership in Alison Krauss' Union Station. He is also a powerful songwriter and has been writing songs for himself and others for years now.... »»»
Washburn, Fleck create "Echoes" Bela Fleck and Abigail Washburn have powerhouse individual talents; each has followed an estimable career path to where they find themselves today: making complex, but spare, records, writing music together and touring with their son Juno. Their new release, "Echoes In The Valley" features mostly songs written by Fleck and Washburn, banjos, Washburn's strong vocals and very little else.... »»»
Woven Waters CD review - Woven Waters
Tellico hails from that bastion of bluegrass and hybrid bluegrass, Asheville, N.C. to deliver its sophomore album "Woven Waters.'' This effort melds their rather inherent bluegrass affinities with British Isle influences,  »»»
Christmas Everywhere CD review - Christmas Everywhere
Rodney Crowell's "Christmas Everywhere" is a (mostly) melancholy collection of songs, with Christmas time as its setting. It's a strong set of carefully worded tunes, set to widely varying musical backings.  »»»
The Southern Ground Sessions CD review - The Southern Ground Sessions
Blackberry Smoke's "The Southern Ground Sessions" EP is five versions of songs from the band's recent "Find a Light" album, along with a cover of Tom Petty's "You Got Lucky," which also features vocalist/violinist Amanda Shires. »»»
Hard Times and White Lines CD review - Hard Times and White Lines
Whitey Morgan's fourth studio release exhibits the singer/songwriter's reverence for outlaw country and southern rock. The influence of Hank Williams, Jr. is evident on the opening "Honky Tonk Hell" with lyrics that »»»