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Owen registers chart double

Thursday, September 8, 2011 – Jake Owen scored a chart double by being the leading country album in the U.S. for the week ending Sept 17 with "Barefoot Blue Jean Night" and topping the Country Songs chart with the title track. Owen took over the top of the album chart from the Pistol Annies' "Hell on Heels" and the song chart from Remind Me by Brad Paisley with Carrie Underwood.

On the album chart, Luke Bryan stayed second with "tailgates & tanlines," Jason Aldean third with "My Kinda Party" and Eric Church fourth with "Chief." Pistol Annies dropped to fifth. Glen Campbell debuted in sixth with "Ghost on the Canvas," the final studio album from the veteran, who said he has Alzheimer's.

"American Idol Season 10 Highlights" from Scotty McCreery was up four to eighth. Texas singer Stoney LaRue debuted at 15 with "Velvet." Robert Earl Keen debuted at 21 with "Ready for Confetti."

Remind Me slipped to second on the song chart. Rodney Atkins was up two to third with Take a Back Road. Kenny Chesney's hit, You And Tequila with Grace Potter held onto fourth. Toby Keith was up one to fifth with Made in America. George Strait made into the top 10, moving up 2 to 9 with Here For a Good Time. Blake Shelton also reached the top 10 - at 10 - with God Gave Me You, up 3.

Miranda Lambert climbed 4 to 13 with Baggage Claim. Thompson Square is at 15, up 3, with I Got You. Brantley Gilbert and Jerrod Niemann moved up 3 to 16 and 17 respectively with Country Must Be Wide and One More Drinkin' Song.

Lady Antebellum was the biggest mover with its new single We Owned the Night at 21, up 6. The Band Perry's latest single, All Your Life, stood at 26, up 3.

Church jumped from 35 to 28 with Drink In My Hand. Aldean continued his great year with Tattoos on This Town skyrocketing 9 to 29 in its fourth week on the chart.

On the bluegrass chart, Alison Krauss & Union Station were first again with "Paper Airline." Steve Martin And the Steep Canyon Rangers held onto second with "Rare Bird Alert." Sarah Jarosz was up two to third with "Follow Me Down." "O Brother, Where Art Thou?" deluxe edition was fourth and Dierks Bentley was fifth with "Up on the Ridge."

On the overall chart, Owen was 6th, Bryan 11th, Aldean 13th, Church 15th and Pistol Annies 22nd.

More news for Jake Owen

CD reviews for Jake Owen

Days of Gold CD review - Days of Gold
Jake Owen aims to satisfy all comers (that is, if the current country is your thing), but the individual pieces don't quite add up. The songs may stand up on their own well enough, but when all is said and done, Owen remains an artist without much of an identity or sound. Take, for example, Beachin', one of countless country songs about the good life. Like many of his counterparts these days, there's a spoken, neo hip hop rap part to it. The song is breezy, on the catchy side, but »»»
Endless Summer EP
Jake Owen has been described by some as an artist who has evaded the prototypical country music playbook. And while that may be true, on his "Endless Summer" EP, coaxing a bit more life out of his summer tour with Tim McGraw and Kenny Chesney, the artist openly embraces the classic summer music formula, offering up airy, catchy jams that will remind you of cool breezes and warm waters. Owen chooses to bookend his taste of summer EP with two classic road songs, the first of which being »»»
Barefoot Blue Jean Night CD review - Barefoot Blue Jean Night
Five years ago, Jake Owen debuted on the country music charts with his twangy, yet catchy Yee Haw. Owen, who turned 30 years old on Sunday, has matured as an artist, as evidenced by the 11 songs on his third album, "Barefoot Blue Jean Saturday Night." There's plenty of versatility from southern rock to country and ballads. The title track is one of the Florida native's biggest hits. It has a perfect chorus, and it's just right for the summer time -- whether you're »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Making perfect sense of Striking Matches, The Secret Sisters – The pairing of Striking Matches and The Secret Sisters on tour makes perfect sense. Both are duos, although the Matches are male/female and the Secrets truly are sisters (Rogers is the name, not Secret). Both emphasize keen vocal interplay. And perhaps most importantly, they shared a very famous producer, T Bone Burnett. But when it came to the live... »»»
Concert Review: Whitehorse changes gears – Whitehorse, the Canadian husband-and-wife duo of Melissa McClelland and Luke Doucet, has changed gears. In years past, they were more on the roots side, but you would have scratched your head wondering where that went during their show at what is billed as a folk club. Only Whitehorse couldn't be accused of being folk oriented either in a tour... »»»
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