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Jackson, Church lead Capitol party

Thursday, August 11, 2011 – "Capitol Street Party 4," a free music event open to the public is scheduled to take place near Music Row, on Wednesday, Sept. 21 with low sets by Alan Jackson, Eric Church and newcomer Eric Paslay. EMI Records Nashville's newest singer/songwriter Jon Pardi will extend the street with a special post-party performance at a nearby club.

Capitol Records Nashville President & CEO, Mike Dungan said, "Where else can you experience a true American icon, the artist with the number one album in America and the best new artist to come out this year? All for the low, low price of ... Nothing. It's free. You'd be crazy not to be there."

Texas native Paslay (Pass-Lay) started playing guitar at 15 years old and had aspirations of being a songwriter. He moved to Nashville to attend a music program at Middle Tennessee State University. Seven years after his move to Nashville, Paslay signed with EMI Record Nashville. During those seven years he worked on his songwriting and gigged around town. Paslay has penned or co-penned every song on his debut album, due out next year. He also has a songwriting cut, Friday Night, on the upcoming Lady Antebellum album, as well as, the Jake Owen single Barefoot Blue Jean Night, which he co-wrote with Dylan Altman and Terry Sawchuk.

Pardi comes from a small town in Northern California. He performed karaoke for at his grandmother's home at three. By 8, he was playing the guitar and at 12, he was writing his own songs. Pardi had his first band at age 14, performing a mixture of classic rock and country. Pardi moved to Nashville at 22 years old, where his unique musical style gained the attention of Song Factory which led to a publishing contract.

Last year, more than 10,000 fans packed Demonbreun Street.

More news for Alan Jackson

CD reviews for Alan Jackson

Genuine: The Alan Jackson Story CD review - Genuine: The Alan Jackson Story
Tim O'Brien "Pompadour" Howdy Skies Records Reviewed by Donald Teplyske It is difficult to tally exactly how many albums of new material Tim O'Brien has released since first appearing as part of Hot Rize, the venerable bluegrass band experiencing a well-received resurgence. More than 20 by any count, 30-plus when one considers solo, duet and group offerings, including his most recent success as part of the Earls of Leicester. Aside from a brief flirtation with the »»»
Angels and Alcohol CD review - Angels and Alcohol
Alan Jackson, circa 2015, now might be, unfortunately, considered a retro artist. Jackson, thankfully, does not veer from his traditional country beat on his first new studio disc in three years. It's the traditional sound that makes him a throwback today. In an age of rock and rap meshing with country, Jackson will have none of that on this meat-and-potatoes rendering. Jackson's viewpoint has always been about the simple truths of life. He makes that clear in the leadoff track, »»»
The Bluegrass Album CD review - The Bluegrass Album
Alan Jackson makes his statement crystal clear with the title - "The Bluegrass Album." The traditional country singer has "gone bluegrass," although the idea of a bluegrass disc should not come off as all that far fetched. Yes, there's no pedal steel here, but the sounds, subject and voice are not very different from a typical AJ disc. And this is not the first time that Jackson has veered off the straight and narrow path as his gospel albums indicated. »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Aldean and friends stretch it out, way out – Jason Aldean's tour, "Six String Circus," gets its name from his recent single, "Lights Come On." And titling his tour after a guitar - and more appropriately an electric guitar - makes all the sense in the world. Each act on the bill, which also included A Thousand Horses and Thomas Rhett, use a lot of guitars - but mostly in... »»»
Concert Review: The Jayhawks remain in top form – It's usually a good time to catch a band right after they've released one of their better albums, and "Paging Mr. Proust" is one of The Jayhawks' best. Comprised of smart songs, which consistently put lead singer Gary Louris' engaging vibrato to proper use and instrumental textures that oftentimes stretch the Minnesota act... »»»
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