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Dolly Parton, Buck Owens, Waylon Jennings, Harlan Howard honored by Academy of Country Music

Thursday, April 19, 2007 – The Academy of Country Music said today that country music leaders Harlan Howard, Waylon Jennings, Jack Lameier, Buck Owens, Dolly Parton and Don Williams will be honored at a special ceremony on Wednesday, June 20 in Nashville.

Howard, Jennings, Parton and Williams will be honored with the Cliffie Stone Pioneer Award, presented to an outstanding "pioneer" of country music.

The late Howard is one of the most influential composers in country music. With more than 4,000 songs to his credit, Howard worked with some of the industry's biggest names including Patsy Cline, Hank Williams Jr. and Reba McEntire.

Jennings crafted a new sound that combined his forceful electric guitar, rough-edged lyrics and diverse range. Jennings worked with many artists including Buddy Holly and Willie Nelson. He is also known for writing and performing the theme song from The Dukes of Hazzard. Jennings will be honored posthumously.

Parton's songs include "I Will Always Love You" and "Travelin' Thru."

After seven years with the folk group Pozo Seco Singers, Williams started a solo career that lead to 17 number 1 hits. Williams also developed a style that had gently paced love songs with simple arrangements, vocals and sentiments. After much success in the United States, Williams frequently tours the United Kingdom and South Africa.

Past honorees of the Cliffie Stone Pioneer Award have included Alabama, Johnny Cash, Merle Haggard, George Jones, Loretta Lynn, Tex Ritter, Hank Williams Sr., Bob Wills and Nelson.

The late Owens, who pioneered the Bakersfield Sound, will be honored with the Jim Reeves International Award, presented to an individual, not necessarily an artist, for outstanding contribution to the acceptance of country music throughout the world. Owens had 26 consecutive hits and was honored with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. Owens' influence on country music can be heard today by Dwight Yoakam and Brad Paisley.

Lameier will be honored with the Mae Boren Axton Award, given in recognition of years of dedication and service by an outstanding individual to the Academy of Country Music. Lameier served on the Academy of Country Music Board of Directors for 28 years and was president for 2 of those years. His career in music includes more than 40 years at Sony, and he is a veteran in radio promoting and DJing. In 2006, he received the President's Award from the Country Radio Broadcasters.

Marty Stuart will host the event where the awards will be formally handed out.

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Better Day CD review - Better Day
If Dolly Parton were to host a summer replacement daytime TV show, her new record album could very well be the soundtrack. It is so totally Dolly - an hour's worth of can-do, I'm-country-gol'-dang-it-but-don't-forget-I'm-Hollywood, yet never abandoning the singer-songwriter that's been her overriding trademark. It gets a little silly, which you expect from Dolly. In fact, the song she co-wrote with Mac Davis, Country Is as Country Does - gets a lot silly. »»»
Dolly: Dolly Live From London CD review - Dolly: Dolly Live From London
Dolly Parton took her acoustic guitar, her dazzling array of stage costumes, her still-vibrant-at-60-something voice and her down-home charm to greet her fans across the pond in 2008. She also took a video camera and recording equipment. The CD (and accompanying DVD) was recorded during Parton's sold out performances at the 02 arena in London. As one of the most recognizable faces of country music around the world, it is beautiful to hear how well Parton's universally appealing songs of »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: The Jayhawks remain in top form – It's usually a good time to catch a band right after they've released one of their better albums, and "Paging Mr. Proust" is one of The Jayhawks' best. Comprised of smart songs, which consistently put lead singer Gary Louris' engaging vibrato to proper use and instrumental textures that oftentimes stretch the Minnesota act... »»»
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