Sign up for newsletter
 

Universal signs Ashton Shepherd to deal

Wednesday, April 18, 2007 – Ashton Shepherd, a 20-year-old Alabama native, signed a record deal with Universal Records. The singer, who has no scheduled release date for music on the label, writes all of her own songs. Several, including "I Ain't Dead Yet, " Not Right Now" and This Pain You Put On Me," are posted at her myspace page.

According to a label official, Reba McEntire and Alan Jackson are influences for Shepherd, who has been singing since she was eight.

More news for Ashton Shepherd

CD reviews for Ashton Shepherd

This is America CD review - This is America
Ashton Shepherd's traditional approach to country music garnered her three top 25 songs from her two MCA albums, but now she's out on her own. She is not the singer that Music City would not know what to do with. Shepherd hasn't changed all that much as she hews to a traditional country bent with her twangy, Southern drawl singing and instrumentation. Shepherd has no one but herself to "blame" as she wrote nine of the 10 songs (one assumes that she also penned the »»»
Where Country Grows CD review - Where Country Grows
A voice as robust and nuanced as Ashton Shepherd's brings to mind the old she could sing the phone book joke - only in this case, it would have to be a listing for a small town down a country road, with entries for Southern staples such as Jones' General Store and Billy Bob's Honky Tonk. Those rural places and faces are exactly what Shepherd's new album "Where Country Grows" is built around, its songs every bit as down to earth as its title suggests. »»»
Look It Up CD review - Look It Up
Ashton Shepherd showed a lot of promise on her debut, "Sounds So Good" and the single Takin' Off This Pain from 2008, but somehow nothing quite took off from the CD, and her career seemed stalled. This four-song EP revives it and a teaser of what's to come from a full-length slated for later this year. Shepherd sounds a bit too mannered, overemphasizing words as if she's trying a tad too hard (the kiss-off single Look It Up). She's a fine singer, as she was on her »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Over the Rhine presents its version of holiday songs – Shortly before performing Merle Haggard's downer Christmas song, "If We Make It Through December," Over The Rhine co-leader Linford Detweiler remarked how his wife (and other half of OTR) Karin Bergquist recently described the act's holiday sounds as "reality Christmas music." And when a duo includes a song like "My... »»»
Concert Review: Perhaps not country, but Urban stars – After Keith Urban scorched a version of "Days Go By," a man in his mid-50s in a Led Zeppelin T shirt said to his rhinestone clad lady friend, "This is not country music, that guy's a rock star." Indeed, the chart topping Aussie further contributes to country's multiple personality disorder, but in a category other than pop.... »»»
Subscribe to Country News Digest Country News Digest      Follow Country Standard Time on twitter CST      Visit Country Standard Time on Facebook CST

Elsewhere in the news

Currently at the CST blogs

The Devil Makes Three examine salvation, sin For nearly a decade and a half, The Devil Makes Three has concocted an amazing blend of bluegrass, folk, country, blues, rockabilly and whatever happens to bubble to the surface, and applied it liberally to their songwriting ethic.... »»»
For Shires, home is where the family lies Mercy Rose Isbell recently celebrated her first birthday and, ironically, the album she helped inspire has just been released. Synchronicity is a beautiful thing. Mercy Rose is, of course, the daughter of singer/songwriters Jason Isbell and Amanda Shires, two of the most gifted Americana artists working today... ... »»»
The Earls of Leicester rattle and roar Something old is new again. The Earls of Leicester, fresh from their first release in late 2014 and the IBMA Entertainer of the Year Award for 2015, followed that remarkable success with "Rattle and Roar."... »»»
Gunslinger CD review - Gunslinger
If naming your release "Gunslinger," you'd better let it rip and go for a harder country sound, especially if donning a black cowboy hat on the cover. The reality does not exactly match that sentiment for Garth Brooks, but at times he comes mighty close. »»»
Christmas Together CD review - Christmas Together
Listening to Garth Brooks' and Trisha Yearwood's new holiday album of (mostly) duets, one is once again reminded how Yearwood is one of the most underrated country artists, whereas - if we're being honest - Brooks is a little on the overrated side. »»»
The Life and Songs of Emmylou Harris CD review - The Life and Songs of Emmylou Harris
Perhaps no artist is so ingrained in the very fibre of modern Americana more than Emmylou Harris. Her presence is everywhere - in the music she makes on her own, in the music she shares with others, in the music that feature finds her simply settled in the background sharing supporting vocals or merely lending inspiration. »»»
Mountain Voodoo CD review - Mountain Voodoo
Balsam Range has been at the heart of mainstream bluegrass music since its debut in 2007. "Mountain Voodoo" is an ambitious, and successful, summation of the first decade. Vocal harmonies provide the core of Balsam Range's music. It's mountain music, to be sure, with lots of vocal range. »»»