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Trick Pony debuts new line-up

Wednesday, April 18, 2007 – Trick Pony made its debut last weekend with new lead singer Aubrey Collins at the Country Thunder festival in Arizona and at the 2007 CMT Music Awards. Collins replaced Heidi Newfield, who left to pursue a solo career.

Keith Burns (guitar, vocals,) and Ira Dean (Bass, vocals,) and new lead singer Aubrey Collins did a media blitz at the CMT awards ceremony.

Trick Pony has been in the studio recording songs for an album that will likely be released this fall. "We are fired up and ready to bring the best music we've got and hit the road again stronger than ever," Keith says.

Trick Pony will co-host an annual golf tournament at Five Oaks Golf & Country Club in Lebanon, Tenn. on April 30 to support the Nashville Arthritis Foundation.

More news for Trick Pony

CD reviews for Trick Pony

R.I.D.E. CD review - R.I.D.E.
Saddle up and strap in, buckaroos; Trick Pony delivers arguably their best ride ever. The title of their 14-cut third album stands for Rebellious Individuals Delivering Entertainment, and boy howdy, this trio delivers with all the venom of a coiled up rattlesnake. Heidi Newfield Johnson's throaty vocals turn on a dime from the wink-and-nod "The Bride," struts through "I Can Live With That" and waltzes through Matraca Berg's "Stand in the Middle of Texas." The trio steps from the safety of the »»»
On A Mission
The phrases are "Don't change a good thing," "Don't fix it if it ain't broke" and "Don't leap off a train while it's moving." They all apply to the second release by Trick Pony, the hot trio that took mainstream country by surprise with last year's debut. The focus here, while progressing as singers, players and writers, is to remain on the beaten path. Most of this disc is about high energy right from the opening strains of the title cut, much the same as "Pour Me" set the stage on the debut. »»»
Trick Pony
Similar to the Dixie Chicks, Trick Pony combines solid country rootswith more than a touch of rockabilly to create a spunky and humorouslyappealing mix. In addition to the single "Pour Me," which is a play on both self-pity and strong drink, the trio also brings along Johnny Cash and Waylon Jennings for Cash's"Big River" and returns to the heartbreak theme for "Party of One" and "OneIn A Row." Everybody in the group sings, but this horse sounds its most untamedwhen Heidi Newfield's female vocals lead the herd. »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Gibson Brothers join "Brotherhood" in style – The idea of releasing "Brotherhood" by veteran bluegrass band The Gibson Brothers was a natural. The disc paid tribute to a long list of brother acts including the Everlys and lesser known acts like the York Brothers and the Four Brothers. While the younger Gibson, Leigh, sure gave Eric a ton of grief throughout the show - all in jest, of... »»»
Concert Review: Moorer, Gauthier pull for each other – In their own right, Allison Moorer and Mary Gauthier did not really need the other because each is most capable of headlining. But in one of those geniuses of booking, fans had the chance to see the two in a most enjoyable and alternative setting - a good, old-fashioned guitar pull. That meant that the two were seated in comfortable chairs on... »»»
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