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Shania TV series starts in May

Friday, March 18, 2011 – Oprah Winfrey Network will premiere the series "Why Not? with Shania Twain" starting on Sunday, May 8.

Airing that night at 11 p.m. eastern/Pacific following the "The Judds" finale, the series will move to its regular time period (Sundays at 10 p.m. eastern/Pacific) beginning the following Sunday, May 15.

"Why Not? with Shania Twain" documents the journey of Twain, who by the age of 21 had survived a childhood of poverty and the loss of both her parents' in an accident. She went on to become the best-selling female artist in country music history. Then, her 14-year marriage to her producer, Robert "Mutt" Lange ended allegedly after a relationship with their housekeeper. Now she opens up about her heartbreak.

In the series, Twain returns to her childhood home in Timmins, Northern Ontario, Canada with her sister, Carrie Ann, to revisit the memories of their adolescence and their parents death. She then continues on her journey with her band mates and confidants as she steps out on a cross-country adventure. Along the way, Twain meets with vocal doctors and coaches, as well as a grief counselor to work through the emotional connection of her vocal restrictions. She also meets with people and families that have experienced similar hardships in their lives, and has intimate one-on-one conversations with experts in the music industry including Gladys Knight, Lionel Richie and David Foster, who provide guidance and inspiration as she attempts to reclaim her voice.

More news for Shania Twain

CD reviews for Shania Twain

UP!
When listening to Shania Twain's first album in five years, the listener is faced with making the big decision - blue or green disc. Green supposedly contains 19 country songs. With red, you get the pop version of those same exact songs recorded (international fans get a blue album with Asian sounds). Twain may be generous with the amount of material here, but the overall effect is one of too much music and not enough quality. Yes, there are some country touches and instrumentation, but if you »»»
Come On Over
Like a good many country artists in the HNC phase of country, success seems to breed a situation where artists turn their backs on the very genre which spawned them. After the massive success of "The Woman In Me," Shania Twain has strayed very far from country in what is essentially a pop album. Few of the 16 songs are country: the first single, the catchy, uptempo "Love Gets Me Every Time" with its killer three fiddle attack, "You're Still The One," "Honey, I'm Home," (a lousy job blues song, »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Alabama Shakes, Elvis celebrate music – Donald Trump was nowhere to be seen at the final day of the Newport Folk Festival, but that didn't mean he was ignored. Maybe it was the political roots of folk music. The Republican presidential candidate was mentioned at least three times - all by foreign musicians - during the finale. No one exactly endorsed his candidacy either.... »»»
Concert Review: Newport Folk Fest retains its beauty – With acts ranging from Ray LaMontagne to The Staves to Case/Lang/Veirs, the Newport Folk Festival ran the gamut from tried and true to not so well known to brand new (sort of) acts. And that was the beauty of day one of the festival in enabling attendees to sample a wide range of music and genres, albeit little of it folk as we once knew it.... »»»
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