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Martina McBride sings of Teenager Daughters

Tuesday, March 15, 2011 – Martina McBride, mother of three daughters ranging from 5 to 16, put her daughters in her son. Delaney, 16, Emma, 12, and Ava, 5, provide the autobiographical content of McBride's new single, Teenage Daughters, off her upcoming Republic Nashville debut album release

The song, co-written by McBride and The Warren Brothers, has the theme of children coming of age and parents trying to survive their offspring's transformation into adulthood while reflecting back to their own lost adolescence.

"Almost everybody goes through it," said McBride. "So I'm not surprised when people tell me how much they relate to this song...even the dads who were 'Prince Charming' in their little girl's world until she discovered boys. They all get it. This is every day life and it's why I love country music. It touches us right at the heart of what we are feeling or dealing with on a daily basis."

The inspiration for the song came naturally. "The Warrens and I were catching up on our lives before we started writing. I was telling them how interesting it is to have a teenager and how it goes from you being the center of their universe, to their life being more about their friends and gaining independence," said McBride. "The little girl who thought you were so cool and always wanted to hold your hand or would dance with you in the kitchen, suddenly is a little embarrassed by those things. It's just inevitable as they grow up. It's their job to become more independent and our job to walk the balance between keeping them close and letting them go a little at a time. No matter how much you think you are prepared for it, it still takes you by surprise."

"Another thing about the song that is relatable," McBride said, "is the fact that we used to be the ones breaking the rules and taking risks while our teenagers can't even imagine us that way. It's hard to reconcile the image we have of ourselves as wild and crazy, fun people with their image of us as just "Mom and Dad". It's not until they get older that they realize how much we have been through and how much wisdom we have to offer. And how fun we really are.

"I love the fact that Teenage Daughters blends humor, sass and sweetness. It shows a very real side of my personality that I'm not sure I've shown in a song before. It's definitely a very personal song and, to me, it just feels like an honest conversation between mothers and fathers of teenage daughters everywhere."

McBride wrote seven more tracks for her new album (due out this fall). After 18 million album sales, the CD will her first on a new label, Republic Nashville, first working with her co-producer Byron Gallimore (Faith Hill, Tim McGraw) and first to have written the majority of the material herself.

"I finally made the time to write more and it's made this album so much more personal," said McBride. "I won't sing a song unless I can tell the story or relate to the lyric, and I don't believe you have to write the lyric to relate to it. But this album shows so many sides of my personality, and the fact that I wrote most of it will make it interesting and fun for my fans."

McBride will perform as part of the "Girls' Night Out: Superstar Women of Country" which will air April 22 on CBS at 8 p.m. eastern.

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Everlasting CD review - Everlasting
When an established artist is somewhat "in between" albums, a greatest hits package can often bridge that gap. Or a live album. Or perhaps a cringe-worthy Christmas album. If you're Rod Stewart you can create a cottage industry from old standards. But few decide to try to enhance or pay tribute to old soul songs that can almost never be duplicated. However Martina McBride decided to go down that road on her latest offering with acclaimed producer Don Was helping out. »»»
Hits and More CD review - Hits and More
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Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Womack planned a good night – Lee Ann Womack pretty much summed up where she's at these days in concluding her show with Don Williams "Lord I Hope This Day Is Good." The ever-strong voiced country traditionalist sang, "I don't need fortune and I don't need fame" with the concluding line of the stanza asking the Man upstairs to "plan a good day for me.... »»»
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