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Stanley marks recording anniversary with two CDs

Friday, February 18, 2011 – Feb. 22, 2011 marks a special anniversary for Rebel Records. On that date 40 years ago, Ralph Stanley & the Clinch Mountain Boys walked into Roy Homer's studio to cut their first recordings for Rebel Records.

In honor of this occasion, Rebel will offer two more Stanley releases as part of a label effort to reissue classic Rebel albums for digital download: "Something Old, Something New" and "I'll Wear a White Robe" will be available at major digital stores including iTunes and Amazon MP3 on Feb. 22.

Among the tracks Stanley recorded during that February 1971 Rebel session included several that would make it on to "Something Old, Something New." "Something Old" was his second to be released on the Rebel label and the first that included secular material. The disc offers a cross section of music: straight hard-driving bluegrass numbers like Going to Georgia and Katy Daley, slower-paced songs with harmonies like Will You Miss Me and That Lonesome Old Song, old-time instrumental pieces such as the clawhammer banjo-driven Old Time Pickin', and several sacred numbers including a haunting rendition of Gloryland sung a cappella in quartet formation.

The band features The Clinch Mountain Boys in their classic early 1970s lineup with Jack Cooke on bass, Curly Ray Cline on fiddle, Roy Lee Centers on rhythm guitar, Stanley on banjo and the band's then-newest members - Keith Whitley on lead guitar and Ricky Skaggs on mandolin and fiddle. Lead singing duties are split between Centers and Stanley on "Something Old, Something New."

Released in 1980, "I'll Wear a White Robe" was the first album Stanley cut for Rebel after label direction changed hands from Dick Freeland to current owner Dave Freeman. This was the first Stanley gospel album to feature the young new lead singer Charlie Sizemore. The CD includes Mountain Preacher's Child, Walking Up This Hill on Decoration Day and I'll Wear a White Robe. In addition to Stanley and Sizemore, the band's lineup features Junior Blankenship on lead guitar as well as Clinch Mountain mainstays Cline on fiddle and Cooke on bass.

More news for Ralph Stanley

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Man of Constant Sorrow (2015) CD review - Man of Constant Sorrow (2015)
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A Mother's Prayer CD review - A Mother's Prayer
On encountering a new album from an artist whose catalog already runs into triple digits over a career now in its seventh decade, it's easy to wonder how much more he's really got to say. But for Ralph Stanley, now 84 and more than 10 years removed from the renown he gained in the course of the O Brother phenomenon, there's still a deep well of music to be drawn from the lives and faith of his Appalachian forebears. "A Mother's Prayer" is far from his first »»»
Old-Time Pickin' A Clawhammer Banjo Collection CD review - Old-Time Pickin' A Clawhammer Banjo Collection
After more than 50 years of pickin' and singing, Dr. Ralph Stanley's legend continues to grow. Stanley is widely renowned for his clawhammer banjo picking, which he picked up as a child in the hills of Virginia. With brother Carter doing most of the singing, they formed a powerful presence in traditional music. It was not until the death of Carter, that Ralph's own vocal prowess began to emerge. Stanley's tenor vocals truly shine in harmony here with Charlie Sizemore in »»»
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Concert Review: Kristofferson gives insight, but no easy answers – When they say music gets better with age, they're not always just talking about songs alone; sometimes they're also referring to the listener. When Kris Kristofferson sings, "Well, I woke up Sunday morning/With no way to hold my head that didn't hurt," to smartly open "Sunday Mornin' Comin' Down," he... »»»
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