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Carolina Chocolate Drops win Traditional Folk Grammy

Sunday, February 13, 2011 – The Carolina Chocolate Drops took the Grammy for Best Traditional Folk Album with "Genuine Negro Jig" on Sunday.

We weren't expecting that," said a tearful Rhiannon Giddens in accepting the award.

"This is very much a great honor," said Dom Fleming. He also thanked Joe Henry, who produced the disc. "The black string band tradition has been sadly unrecognized, and we're just glad we can be out the representing tunes that people can enjoy."

Others nominated were "Onward And Upward," Luther Dickinson & The Sons Of Mudboy
"Memories Of John," The John Hartford Stringband
"Maria Muldaur & Her Garden Of Joy," Maria Muldaur
"Ricky Skaggs Solo: Songs My Dad Loved," Ricky Skaggs

More news for Carolina Chocolate Drops

CD reviews for Carolina Chocolate Drops

Leaving Eden CD review - Leaving Eden
When Rhiannon Giddens urgently sings the autobiographical Country Girl, which rocks with a distinctly acoustic thump, it's a clear sign that Carolina Chocolate Drops is much more than just an old time music revival band. Granted, this act incorporates a lot of sounds you won't likely hear too often on contemporary radio, such as the hand clap backed gospel rhythm section supporting Read 'Em John. But to flippantly suggest CCD is somehow lost in the past, would gravely »»»
Genuine Negro Jig CD review - Genuine Negro Jig
Authenticity is a loaded subject when it comes to roots music. While the Carolina Chocolate Drops certainly could pass for the real thing at times, theirs is thankfully not a slavish devotion to the black banjo players and string band music that has inspired them. That freedom to improvise and innovate within their chosen style has resulted in this wonderful set of both traditional and contemporary tunes that all share one thing - the enthusiastic performances of the players. »»»
Dona Got a Ramblin' Mind CD review - Dona Got a Ramblin' Mind
For those who believe old time string music to only be the domain of Appalachian Scotch Irish heritage, the Carolina Chocolate Drops convincingly refute the misconception. After studying under the great Joe Thompson, the Chocolate Drops, an African-American trio, are poised to preserve their musical past. The collection by Dom Flemons, Rhiannon Giddens and Justin Robinson ranges from string band tunes to mournful ballads. Interpretations of songs such as "Tom Dula" and "Georgie »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Hard Working Americans more than live up to moniker – Hard Working Americans is a generic enough sounding term, conveying that you're part of the lunch bucket crowd. Part of a faceless pack instead of an individual. In reality, it's something of a misnomer for the sextet of the same name heretofore considered a side project. That's because they or in most cases, their other... »»»
Concert Review: Wolf rolls on with ease – Peter Wolf starts off his first disc in six years, "A Cure for Loneliness," with "Rolling On." Great title for a song, and as he would prove in concert, he lived up to those words. The song starts "You can lay down and die / You can lay up and count the tears you've cried / But baby, that's not me / There's a... »»»
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