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Steve Earle preps new CD

Monday, January 24, 2011 – Steve Earle is set to release "I'll Never Get Out Of This World Alive," his 14th album, on April 26 via New West Records. The album is the anticipated follow up to the Grammy Award winning 2009 release "Townes."

The 11-track set was produced by T Bone Burnett and is Earle's first collection of original material since his 2007 Grammy Award winning, "Washington Square Serenade." The CD will be available as a single compact disc, deluxe CD/DVD set, digitally and 180 gram vinyl.

Writing for the new CD began three years ago, the longest span of any song cycle in Earle's career. The first two compositions were God Is God and I Am A Wanderer, 2 songs written by Earle for Joan Baez' 2008 album, "Day After Tomorrow," which Earle also produced.

The album also includes This City, written for the HBO Original Series, "Treme," which Earle also appeared in as an actor. This year, Earle will be reprising his role of Harley during many episodes of Treme's second season. This City features horn arrangements by Allen Toussaint and has garnered a Grammy Award Nomination in the Best Song Written for Motion Picture, Television or Other Visual Media Category. Additionally, the song also garnered Earle's first Emmy Award nomination in the Outstanding Original Music and Lyrics Category. "I'll Never Get Out Of This World Alive" also features Heaven or Hell, a duet with Earle's wife, Allison Moorer.

"They are all, as far as I can tell, about mortality in one way or the other; death as a mystery rather than a punctuation mark or at least, a comma rather than a period," Earle said on the liner notes. Earle's long anticipated debut novel of the same name will be published on May 12 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. The novel imagines the troubled life of Doc Ebersole as he is haunted by the ghost of his former patient and friend, Hank Williams. The title of both Earle's new album and debut novel is taken from the Williams song by the same name; the last single released during his lifetime in 1952.

After many years of touring solo and acoustically worldwide, Earle will tour in support of the album with his former backing band The Dukes.

Songs on the CD are:
1. Waitin' On The Sky
2. Little Emperor
3. The Gulf of Mexico
4. Molly - O
5. God is God
6. Meet Me In The Alleyway
7. Every Part of Me
8. Lonely Are The Free
9. Heaven or Hell (with Allison Moorer)
10. I Am A Wanderer
11. This City

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The Warner Bros Years CD review - The Warner Bros Years
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The Low Highway CD review - The Low Highway
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Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Great songs, not glitz, highlight Lynn tribute – An eclectic group of Americana artists gathered together for a relatively low-key tribute to Loretta Lynn on the eve of the glitzy Grammy Awards. In contrast to the expensive dresses and song sets displayed at Staples Center for the awards show TV broadcast, these performers were backed by a skillful traditional country music house band.... »»»
Concert Review: McBride soldiers on – Martina McBride said of "Reckless," her first country album in five years, that she wanted to get back to the old school, sorting through hundreds of songs from Music City's best songwriters and employing its best producers. As it turns out, it wasn't a very long trip. The Kansas native broke onto the scene with her 1992... »»»
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