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IIIrd Tyme Out's Loudermilk signs with Mountain Fever

Thursday, December 2, 2010 – Mountain Fever Records signed Edgar Loudermilk, bass player with Russell Moore & IIIrd Tyme Out, and will release the first single this week.

Can't Live Life Here Without You, a duet with Rhonda Vincent is from Loudermilk's debut solo project, "Roads Travelled," due out in mid-January 2011.

Influenced greatly by his father and grandfather, Loudermilk cut his teeth on bluegrass by learning to play bass to the record, "Bluegrass Album Band Volume 1." Surrounded by music at an early age, he was only nine when he began playing bass in his family's band, Loudermilk was also exposed to the great music of some of his famous relatives, The Louvin Brothers. He continued to play in his family's band until he was 20 years old when he joined a group called Carolina Crossfire. The band had a following in the Georgia area.

In 2001, Loudermilk started playing with Vincent. About a year later, he became the bass player and tenor singer in the newly formed group Full Circle and would back up Marty Raybon for almost five years. "I really enjoyed playing with Rhonda and Marty," said Loudermilk. "My first professional job was with Rhonda, and I learned so much from her. Working with Marty was really a great experience because we not only played bluegrass, but we got to play some of the old Shenandoah music, too."

In 2006, Loudermilk heard that Ray Deaton was leaving IIIrd Tyme Out. "I'd been singing tenor for Rhonda and Marty and knowing that Ray was a great bass singer, I practiced really hard for that audition with Russell." Loudermilk became the newest member of IIIrd Tyme Out, replacing Deaton in July,2007. "I really love the music of this band," said Loudermilk. "Singing with Russell Moore is the compliment of my life because I don't believe there's a better singer anywhere."

On his CD, Loudermilk wrote or co-wrote all 12 tracks. He was accompanied by Tim Crouch; fiddle, Randy Kohrs; Dobro, Scott Hass; banjo and former Full Circle band-mates Ashby Frank; mandolin and Shane Blackwell. Guest vocalists include Raybon, (duet on Roads Travelled), Cia Cherryholmes (duet on It Just Might), Vincent (duet on Can't Live Life Here Without You), Moore, Randy Kohrs and another former Full Circle band-mate, Glenn Harrell.

"I wrote Can't Live Life Here Without You with Rhonda Vincent in mind," said Loudermilk. "I just knew it would be perfect for her voice, and she certainly did not disappoint. It's one of my favorite cuts off the whole project."

"This record is a good breakthrough for me with my writing and I am hoping to continue in that direction," said Loudermilk. "I've got many of my musical mentors and heroes on this record, and I am a very happy and blessed man.."

More news for IIIrd Tyme Out

CD reviews for IIIrd Tyme Out

IIIrd Tyme Out CD review - IIIrd Tyme Out
One of the best bands in bluegrass, IIIrd Tyme Out, delivers again. With material from a variety of writers, including three songs by Russell Moore and an instrumental by band-mate and ace mandolist Wayne Benson, they offer a variety of songs. Edgar Loudermilk now plays bass while Justin Haynes continues on fiddle and long-time member Steve Dilling is on banjo. Russell has one of the best lead voices in the business and drives a song hard. Hard Rock Mountain Prison is a prime example of his style. »»»
Footprints: A IIIrd Tyme Out Collection CD review - Footprints: A IIIrd Tyme Out Collection
Arguably one of the premier bluegrass bands from 1991 to the present, IIIrd Tyme Out has a huge fan base and they consistently put out great recordings and great performances. The recent departure of founding member Ray Deaton makes this retrospective release even more interesting. Not that it needed help. With 15 songs, 2 of them first releases, there's a wealth of great material here. 3TO's rendition of The Platters's top 10 hit "Only You" was released as an »»»
Back To The MAC
"More!" will be the first thing you say when you listen to IIIrd Tyme Out's return to the Mountain Arts Center CD for another live outing. Great musicians are almost a given on bluegrass recordings, and this band has some of the best. They are also blessed with one of the best lead singers in bluegrass, Russell Moore. This CD features older songs, some standards, some lesser known. They plumb the depths of emotion with an Osborne Brothers' tune, "Medals For Mother" and set your blood pumping with »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Carlile takes her chances on feeling "Blue" – During a rare moment sitting at the piano and appropriately dressed in blue, Brandi Carlile paraphrased a memorable Joni Mitchell quote. Basically, it went that, if you listen to Joni Mitchell music and only picture Mitchell - but not yourself - something is wrong. While Carlile, who performed Mitchell's "Blue" album in its entirety for... »»»
Concert Review: The Head and the Heart go beyond the nah nahs – "Nah nah," "la la" and "Wee oh" populated a number of songs from The Head and the Heart. Yes, the Seattle-based band does pen a good amount of sing-along songs that were clearly designed that way. And while that style can certainly engage and energize a crowd, there was more to that from the sextet.... »»»
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