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Judds, Galante receive radio honors

Monday, November 29, 2010 – The Judds will receive the Country Radio Broadcasters 2011 CRB Career Achievement Award recipient and industry executive Joe Galante the CRB President's Award, it was announced Monday.

The awards are presented each year at the Country Radio Hall of Fame Dinner and Awards ceremony, which will be March 1, 2011 in Nashville.

The CRB Career Achievement Award is presented to an individual artist or act that has made a significant contribution to the development and promotion of country music and radio through their creativity, vision, performance or leadership, according to CRB.

"Since their arrival on the country music scene in the early '80s, The Judds have been trailblazers, trendsetters and hit-makers, and they are still entertaining millions of fans around the world with their music," said CRB President Mike Culotta. "Country radio would not be the same without these two fantastic ladies, and because of that, we are honoring them with the CRB Career Achievement Award."

The President's Award is presented to an individual who has made a significant contribution to the marketing, production, growth and development of the Country Radio Seminar and the multiple services that CRB provides to the country radio and music communities.

"Very few people have made as much of an impact in our industry as Joe Galante," said Culotta. "The acts that he has worked with during his almost 40 years in the business have also been some of country radio's biggest superstars. He has always been a friend to country radio, and I have a feeling there are plenty more great things ahead for him in this business. It's an honor to announce Joe Galante as our 2011 President's Award recipient."

The 2011 Country Radio Hall of Fame inductees are Dale Carter, Barry Kent and Lee Rogers in the On-Air Personality category and Charlie Cook, Dene Hallam and Bill Payne in the Radio category.

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