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Little Big Town, Houser reveals songwriting M.O. on Today

Friday, November 12, 2010 – Little Big Town and Randy Houser will reveal their strategies of songwriting on NBC's Weekend Today in a segment titled "Secrets of Songwriters."

"When we went into the studio to record 'The Reason Why,' we put a lot of emphasis on the writing process and song selection for the record, and it's great to share the secrets behind the songs with the fans," said LBT's Karen Fairchild.

"Sometimes I'll be sitting on this couch and the words will come from out of nowhere and pop into my head... I'll grab a pen and paper, and the lyrics will start coming almost faster than I can write," Houser said from the den of his Nashville home. "Other times I'll draw blanks and leave a song incomplete and not pick it up again until I'm inspired by someone's story I hear out on the road."

In this behind-the-scenes interview, viewers will discover the motivation and mental element of Houser as a songwriter - from the moment an idea is born, to the day it is tracked in the studio. He will uncover stories of personal revelation in new single, A Man Like Me and show how others often inspire his writing like in the song Here With Me, an emotional ballad completed after an encounter he had with military personnel while performing on a USO Tour in early 2010.

For a portion of the segment, album producer Cliff Audretch III will join Houser to provide insight on how to capture the sound and feel of a song as it is originally envisioned with musical instruments and other special effects.

The show will air Saturday Nov. 13 in the 8 a.m. eastern hour of the broadcast.

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Fired Up CD review - Fired Up
A brand of neo-traditional country music has entered the mainstream scene in response to the hip hop beats of bro country and smooth EDM of metro country. Artists like Aaron Watson and Randy Houser are providing a strong alternative on the charts for fans who prefer their country closer to its roots. The challenge for a country artist today is to find a balance between the fans and their business. A small handful of writers are responsible for most of the mainstream chart toppers, resulting in a »»»
How Country Feels CD review - How Country Feels
Despite a good track record of releasing quality music, Randy Houser hasn't become a consistent chart-topper yet. His new album, "How Country Feels," has already brought him one hit song with the title track, so perhaps a change of scenery (Houser is now on Stoney Creek) was what his career needed. Houser's last album, "They Call Me Cadillac," was a bluesy, varied album that unfortunately yielded no hits. This time around, he's gone for a much simpler »»»
They Call Me Cadillac CD review - They Call Me Cadillac
Country music needs more true country songs, not more songs proving country credentials. Randy Houser's latest contains a few examples of the former. After bragging unnecessarily in one verse about liking to "smoke from my left hand," he ends the chorus to Whistlin' Dixie by stating, "I ain't just Whistlin' Dixie." Then on the bluesy, rocking Out Here In The Country he tells us, "Them city lights ain't my cup of tea." But this bluster all »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Hard Working Americans more than live up to moniker – Hard Working Americans is a generic enough sounding term, conveying that you're part of the lunch bucket crowd. Part of a faceless pack instead of an individual. In reality, it's something of a misnomer for the sextet of the same name heretofore considered a side project. That's because they or in most cases, their other... »»»
Concert Review: Wolf rolls on with ease – Peter Wolf starts off his first disc in six years, "A Cure for Loneliness," with "Rolling On." Great title for a song, and as he would prove in concert, he lived up to those words. The song starts "You can lay down and die / You can lay up and count the tears you've cried / But baby, that's not me / There's a... »»»
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