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Marty Stuart plans new disc for June

Monday, March 26, 2007 – Marty Stuart will release "Compadres: An Anthology of Duets," June 5, launching his year-long celebration of country music. That week will include the release of the new album, a museum exhibit opening and a concert tour kicking off with "Marty Stuart's 6th Annual Late Night Jam."

Compadres will be out on Stuart's imprint Superlatone Records/Hip-O/UME, his first album with new Los Angeles-based label partner Universal Music Enterprises.

Each of the album's 14 tracks features Stuart with one of the many compadres he has met on a musical journey that began at age 13 on the road with Lester Flatt. Featured songs include the rural lament "Farmer's Blues" recorded with Merle Haggard while on the pair's 2003 Electric Barnyard tour, "Crying, Waiting, Hoping" with Steve Earle and a collaboration with gospel great Mavis Staples on "Move Along Train," showcasing the building melody penned by the late Pop Staples.

The new work also highlights never-before-heard duets with Loretta Lynn on Dallas Frazier's "Will You Visit Me On Sunday" and with bluegrass quintet Old Crow Medicine Show on a version of The Who's "I Can See For Miles." Other partners are B.B. King, Johnny Cash, George Jones, Del McCoury, wife Connie Smith, Travis Tritt, Lester Flatt and the Nashville Grass, Earl Scruggs and The Staples Singers.

"The people on 'Compadres' come from a wildcat America, a less tamed America," Stuart said. "Pops Staples, Steve Earle, Earl Scruggs, B.B. King, these are the kind of people who made America a more interesting place - sonically, visually, spiritually. Those are the people I wanted to emulate as a kid, those are the people I ended up traveling with. I like to think I ended up one of them. They brought a complexity to their music; they brought their sweat, their soul, their lives."

Stuart's private memorabilia collection will exhibit as "Sparkle & Twang: Marty Stuart's American Musical Odyssey" and debut at the Tennessee State Museum featuring more than 40 years of country, bluegrass, rock and gospel music. Highlights include Hank Williams' handwritten lyrics to "Your Cheatin' Heart" and Cash's trademark "Man in Black" suit, as well as other treasures from the late Patsy Cline and Elvis Presley.

"I believe country music holds a prominent place within the arts. For many years, I have been passionate about collecting and archiving the treasures of country music and its people," said Stuart. "Now it is my joy to collaborate with the Tennessee State Museum in bringing these treasures back for the world to see and enjoy."

The collection covers the impact of fashion and music on the popular culture of America as revealed through performance costumes, accessories, handwritten lyrics, personal letters, instruments owned by country music legends and unpublished photographs. The exhibition embraces the story of Stuart's personal experiences with some of the most famous stars of country music.

Stuart will host his Sixth Annual Late Night Jam on June 5 at Nashville's Ryman Auditorium. The marathon of music, featuring an all-star lineup and guests, has raised more than $70,000 to date for MusiCares, the philanthropic arm of The Recording Academy. Keith Urban, Dierks Bentley, Wynonna, Miranda Lambert, Shooter Jennings, Old Crow Medicine Show, Montgomery Gentry, Billy Gibbons, Jerry Lee Lewis and Earl Scruggs showed up in previous years.

Stuart is also producing forthcoming albums for American music master Porter Wagoner (also June 5) and award winning country vocalist Kathy Mattea, as well as putting the finishing touches on a new photography book titled "Country Music: The Masters." Stuart is also out on touring with his Fabulous Superlatives at big music events such as the Stagecoach Festival and the Edmonton Folk Festival.

More news for Marty Stuart

CD reviews for Marty Stuart

Way Out West CD review - Way Out West
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Saturday Night/ Sunday Morning CD review - Saturday Night/ Sunday Morning
Since leaving his 1990s' mainstream country music output in his tracks, Marty Stuart has been on an incredible run, both in terms of quality and quantity. Not only has he continued to perfect his rocking-yet-traditional brand of country music, but he has also released several well-regarded gospel albums. His latest double, "Saturday Night/Sunday Morning," gives a double helping of music that will please both secular and sacred music fans. The country half is in keeping with »»»
Nashville: Volume 1 - Tear the Woodpile Down CD review - Nashville: Volume 1 - Tear the Woodpile Down
Marty Stuart lives and breathes country music. It's in his blood through associations with folks like Johnny Cash. He's a huge collector of country's history, a photographer, and, oh yeah, quite a fine musician. Stuart returns for another superb disc of only 10 songs (that's the only criticism here in a tight 31 or so minute set) mixing his stellar, full-bodied Mississippi drawl vocals, great playing, an instrumental, a spoken word (not the first time he has done that) with »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Daniels wears out bows, but music endures – After each of the first few songs Charlie Daniels played, his 'fiddle tech (?)' exchanged his bow. Is this because he was playing particularly hard? Perhaps. Whatever the case, Daniels and his five-piece band clearly appeared to be giving it their all during the act's hour-and-a-half set. As it is the Christmas month, Daniels sang a... »»»
Concert Review: Rawlings easily moves out of the shadow – Every once in awhile David Rawlings moves out of the shadow of musical mate Gillian Welch to launch his own tour. While Welch, for whom Rawlings plays guitar, has the more prominent career, nights like this ably confirm that there is a reason does his own thing as well. Rawlings, who released the very fine "Poor David's Almanack" in... »»»
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