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All for the Hall does it again

Wednesday, October 6, 2010 – The Country Music Museum and Hall of Fame received a shot in the arm thanks to the second annual All for the Hall fundraiser spearheaded by Keith Urban and Vince Gill Tuesday in Nashville.

We're back for more All for the Hall!" said Urban, who announced during last year's inaugural concert that he would return to do it again in 2010 at the Bridgestone Arena.

Country Music Hall of Fame member and board president Vince Gill co-hosted the sold-out concert, as he did last year. Other guests this year included Gill's fellow Hall of Fame members Dolly Parton and Charley Pride plus Billy Currington, Alan Jackson, Alison Krauss, Miranda Lambert, John Mayer,and Martina McBride.

When bringing out Gill, who initiated the All for the Hall cause, Urban said, "This whole thing got started by this guy."

The All for the Hall idea asks country performers, from superstars to club acts, to donate proceeds from one performance a year to the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum.

Urban opened with a 30-minute set with his band, then stayed onstage to introduce and perform with each act. Gill followed him, setting the format for the rest of the concert by performing two songs: his hit One More Last Chance and a cover of Two More Bottles of Wine, chosen from the repertoire of one of his primary influences, Country Music Hall of Fame member Emmylou Harris.

Gill and Urban played guitar behind each act, joined by an all-star band of Nashville session players of drummer Eddie Bayers, steel guitarist Paul Franklin, keyboardist John Hobbs, guitarist Dann Huff, bassist Michael Rhodes, and keyboardist Pete Wasner. "It's not every day you get to have Keith Urban and Vince Gill back you up," said Lambert.

"This is working out pretty good, ain't it kids?" Gill asked as Jackson left the stage after a rousing rendition of Hank Williams' Mind Your Own Business.

The evening ended with an extended version of Don Williams's Tulsa Time with Gill and Urban starting the song off, and Jackson, McBride, and Parton joining midway through to sing verses. "See you again next year," Urban shouted at the show's end as the sold-out crowd shouted its approval.

The set list was:

Keith Urban:
"Kiss a Girl"
"Days Go By"
"Stupid Boy"
"Put You in a Song"
"Somebody Like You"

Vince Gill
"One More Last Chance"
"Two More Bottles of Wine"

Martina McBride
"Broken Wing"
"Is There Life Out There?"

Billy Currington
"Must Be Doing Something Right"
"Sweet Music Man"

Miranda Lambert
"The House That Built Me"
"Tonight the Bottle Let Me Down"

Urban
"I Wouldn't Want to Live If You Didn't Love Me"

Charley Pride
"Kiss an Angel Good Morning"
"Hello Darlin'"

Alan Jackson
"Chattahoochee"
"Mind Your Own Business"

Alison Krauss
"I Know Who Holds Tomorrow"
"Ghost in This House"

John Mayer
"I'm Gonna Find Another You"
"Ain't That Lonely Yet"

Dolly Parton
"Jolene"
"He Stopped Loving Her Today"

Finale - Urban and Gill
"Tulsa Time" with Jackson, McBride and Parton

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