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George Richey, Wynette's husband, dies

Monday, August 16, 2010 – George Richey, a producer, writer and third husband of Tammy Wynette, died July 31 of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, it was disclosed today. Richey was buried in Nashville near the grave of Wynette.

Born George Richardson on Nov. 30 1935 in Promise Land, Ark. Richey co-wrote classic country songs that were recorded by artists including Wynette and George Jones. He aided in the creation of Wynette's 'Til I Can Make It On My Own and Jones' (A Picture of Me) Without You and The Grand Tour. He produced material for Wynette, Merle Haggard, Johnny Horton, Wanda Jackson and others.

He also was a session player, working on recordings by Ringo Starr, Marty Robbins and Lefty Frizzell.

Upon marrying Wynette in 1978, Richey put his career on hold. Throughout much of the 1980s, he was her manager. Wynette passed away in 1998.

In 2001, he married the former Sheila Slaughter. In recent years, Richey educated others about the dangers of smoking. He also worked with the Country Music Hall of Fame to develop the Tammy Wynette: First Lady of Country Music exhibit, set to open on Aug. 20.

He is survived by his wife, Sheila Richey; by daughters Tatum and Deirdre and son, Kelly.

More news for Tammy Wynette

CD reviews for Tammy Wynette

Take Me to Your World/I Don't Wanna Play House
"Take Me to Your World/I Don't Wanna Play House," originally released 30 years ago and rather awkwardly named after its two biggest hits, was Tammy Wynette's second album. If not quite on a par with her achievements in her subsequent two releases "D-I-V-O-R-C-E" and "Stand By Your Man," this is no slouch for all that. "Jackson Ain't a Very Big Town," "Broadminded" and the two title tracks all show producer Billy Sherrill already finding appropriate vehicles for the lyrical subjects and the vocals »»»
Stand By Your Man
No one had a bigger voice or a more tragic catch to their voice than Tammy Wynette - and in that open-throated heartbreak, the collective psyches and traumas of the post-feminist non-feminist woman rose and fell. "Stand By Your Man," from a sociologist's perspective, is certainly the song and, in turn, the album that galvanized Wynette's place as the anti-Steinem; a fact that's both important and misleading. Wynette was never about subservience or being done wrong. She was about compassion and »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Carlile brings thoughtfulness – Brandi Carlile returned to the GRAMMY Museum for the third time, and it's easy to see why she's always invited back. The evening began with GRAMMY Executive Scott Goldman interviewing Carlile on a pair of stuffed chairs, which was followed directly by a brief set of live songs. The interview portion was informative, while Carlile's... »»»
Concert Review: LSD tour provides a lot of highs – This was not your grandkids' country, that's for sure. Even the name of the tour - the LSD Tour - was a throwback (albeit far before the principals were making music). But make no mistake about it. With the ever cool country traditionalist Dwight Yoakam, the country with some rock and blues and rabble rousing of Steve Earle thrown in and the... »»»
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